Latin Conference & Awards

Solo

When pianist Michel Camilo pilots his trio, he gives the Bad Plus a run for its money when it comes to clamor. While much of his recorded output is with the trio, for his latest, the Dominican Republi

When pianist Michel Camilo pilots his trio, he gives the Bad Plus a run for its money when it comes to clamor. While much of his recorded output is with the trio, for his latest, the Dominican Republic native offers "Solo." The aptly titled disc is a moving, lyrical collection of unaccompanied originals, Brazil-based tunes and such jazz standards as Monk's "'Round Midnight" (a tango-tinged interpretation) and George Gershwin's classic "Someone to Watch Over Me" (performed with straight-up sincerity). Instead of crafting an album teeming with rousing leaps, Camilo eases into a low-lit mood with quiet reflections, dreamy musings and heartfelt romancing. A highlight is Antonio Carlos Jobim's "Luiza," rendered as a gorgeous love song with tenderly tumbling runs. However, Camilo does play with the bounce, swing and dynamics he's so well-known for on two of his own: "Un Son," with clave-styled dazzle and glee, and "Suntan," which starts quietly, then climaxes with bold pianistic emotion.—DO