5 Best Jimmy Fallon Classroom Instruments Songs: From Adele to Mariah Carey

Douglas Gorenstein/NBC
Jimmy Fallon and The Roots sing with Adele during the Music Room bit on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon on Nov. 24, 2015.

Did you catch Adele giving fans a whole new version of her megahit "Hello" to obsess over? Tuesday night (Nov. 25) Jimmy Fallon premiered the latest version of his Classroom Instruments bit, and -- to the surprise of no one -- Adele, Fallon, and The Roots hit this version out of the park.

Best 'Tonight Show' Music Moments of the Year

We rounded up five of our favorite Classroom Instrument segments (from both Tonight Show and Late Night With Jimmy Fallon) below for your enjoyment. 

5. "Blurred Lines"
Question: How do you make the infectious 2013 Song of Summer even catchier? Keep the falsetto, add in some classroom instruments. The best part is that with all the kiddie instruments and extra glee, the song doesn't give off the same creepy vibe as the original video.  

4. "All I Want For Christmas is You"
She wouldn't be Mariah Carey if she didn't add in what appear to be a few unrehearsed vocal riffs, but the Roots keep up with her flawlessly. In addition to being a great video to break out before the holidays (like, um, right now), this version also has actual children involved, designed for maximum cuteness overload. 

3. "Call Me Maybe"
The wonderful 2012 Song of Summer was already perfect pop, but adding classroom instruments managed to put a new twist on a song that nearly everyone had already made a goofy YouTube video of. 

2. "Let It Go"
There's a reason this performance made our list of best Tonight Show music moments so far. Everyone looks like they're having a blast, the audience is super into it (check those cheers throughout!), and on a notoriously difficult song, a relaxed, post-Oscars Idina Menzel has never sounded better.
 

1. "Hello"
We have a new reigning champ. "Hello" is a super-sad song, but this version is actually fairly upbeat. Adele's vocals are, of course, stellar, and this rendition eschews the whole ballad idea in favor of something a bit more fun. Is this what an Adele club jam is like?