Michael Jackson's "admissions" in a pair of TV interviews that he shared his bedroom with young boys help prove him guilty of child molestation and should be shown to jurors at his trial, prosecutors

Michael Jackson's "admissions" in a pair of TV interviews that he shared his bedroom with young boys help prove him guilty of child molestation and should be shown to jurors at his trial, prosecutors argued in court papers released yesterday (Feb. 17).

Lawyers for the 46-year-old pop star have made a fresh attempt to remove Santa Barbara County District Attorney Tom Sneddon and his deputies from the case on the grounds that Sneddon may testify at the upcoming trial.

Prosecutors say remarks Jackson made in the documentary and later on CBS' "60 Minutes" that he shared his bedroom with his young accuser -- identified in court as "John Doe" -- and the boy's brother amounts to evidence of his guilt.

"Defendant's statement that he has slept with young boys is admissible as corroboration of the Doe brothers' allegation that he slept with them," prosecutors argue in their 17-page motion, which was unsealed by the court yesterday. "Certainly the admission that he has slept with many boys clearly shows his willingness to sleep with boys."

In the documentary, Jackson describes sharing his bedroom with his young accuser and adds: "I have slept in a bed with many children. I slept in the bed with all of them. When [actor] Macaulay Culkin was little, [his brother] Kieran Culkin would sleep on this side, Macaulay Culkin was on this side, his sisters in there. We would all just jam in the bed."

In a December 2003 interview, Jackson says that "of course" it is acceptable for him to share his bed with children, adding that he is not a pedophile or murderer and that he does so only out of love.

Jackson's lawyers, who in November lost a bid to have Sneddon removed from the trial on the grounds that the veteran prosecutor was "blinded by zeal" to put the singer in prison, renewed that motion in court papers also made public yesterday.

The defense attorneys based the new motion on the grounds that Sneddon, who they say stepped beyond his role as district attorney by conducting investigation in the case, may be required to testify at the trial.


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