Near the beginning of the documentary "Nevermind: Classic Album," former DGC A&R exec Gary Gersh summarizes the restlessness of the early '90s: "I think there was a whole generation of people that

Near the beginning of the documentary "Nevermind: Classic Album," former DGC A&R exec Gary Gersh summarizes the restlessness of the early '90s: "I think there was a whole generation of people that were waiting to have something to follow." Enter Kurt Cobain, who inadvertently popularized punk rock by giving it a melodic backbone and a catchy chorus. Cobain is no longer with us, of course, but bassist Krist Novoselic and drummer Dave Grohl are, and in this 45-minute film, they offer much insight into their old band and the recording of its breakthrough second album. DGC's expectations for "Nevermind"—given some luck with radio and video—were in the 500,000 range, according to Gersh. Since its 1991 release, the set has sold 8.2 million copies, according to Nielsen SoundScan. The film reviews Nirvana's early years quickly and deftly, then gets to the heart of the story with Grohl, Novoselic and producer Butch Vig detailing the "Nevermind" sessions, track by track. Cobain appears only briefly in some obscure interview footage, but the viewer comes away with a strong sense of him during what may have been the happiest period of his life. Four bonus segments prove the filmmakers have done their research. Most impressively, they track down a now-teenage Spencer Elden, who doesn't remember his part in the "Nevermind" saga. (It was Elden's photo, as a newborn, that graced the album's cover.)—JM