For the first time in eight years, pianist Keith Jarrett returns to the live improvisational setting that has spawned some of his greatest work on the double-disc set "Radiance."

For the first time in eight years, pianist Keith Jarrett returns to the live improvisational setting that has spawned some of his greatest work on the double-disc set "Radiance." Due May 3 via ECM (five days before the artist's 60th birthday), the album was taped in October 2002 in Tokyo and Osaka, Japan.

After backing away from solo performances in the wake of health problems in the late '90s, Jarrett staged two shows in Japan in 1999 but was not satisfied with the results. He gave the format another try in 2002, this time building one piece out of the next, as opposed to the long-form improvisations that marked such iconic releases as 1975's "The Koln Concert," which ECM claims is the best-selling piano album of all time.

The first 13 tracks spread across disc one and two of "Radiance" constitute the Osaka show in its entirety, while the remaining four songs are highlights from the Tokyo performance. The latter will be the subject of a DVD due in the fall via ECM.

"How we arrive at profound thoughts has a lot to do with what we aren't thinking beforehand, and I had in mind letting some of the music happen to me without sitting there deep in thought," Jarrett writes in the liner notes. "The listener has to bear with me here. The whole thing is risky, but I've taken you places before and I'm not aiming to disappoint."

While no additional solo shows are in the cards at present, Jarrett will return to the trio format with longtime collaborators Gary Peacock (bass) and Jack DeJohnette (drums) for a June 22 performance at New York's Carnegie Hall.

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