Peter Himmelman accomplishes the unlikely on his 11th solo album: He explores the relationship between God and the rest of us while rocking with high, pleasurable efficiency.

Peter Himmelman accomplishes the unlikely on his 11th solo album: He explores the relationship between God and the rest of us while rocking with high, pleasurable efficiency. Grounded in deep Jewish faith, songs like "Black Rolled Into Black" summon optimism in the midst of sorrow, while "Consumed" is a slow-burning blues that recalls the more questing songs of his father-in-law, Bob Dylan. "Kneel Down," which in a perfect world would be an easy call for adult top 40, is a sensuous, spiritual delight, with words of praise for the underrated skills of '60s pop singer Johnny Rivers. Uptempo cuts like "Loaves of Bread" and "Wet Matches" feature explosive guitars and the in-your-face drums of the Attractions' Pete Thomas. "Imperfect World," Himmelman's best since his 1989 disc "Synesthesia," is distributed by Navarre.—WR