Add the brainy bunch from Brighton, England, to the list of U.K. acts destined to make an impact in the United States. "Open Season" is more disciplined and structured than the act's sprawling, magnet

Add the brainy bunch from Brighton, England, to the list of U.K. acts destined to make an impact in the United States. "Open Season" is more disciplined and structured than the act's sprawling, magnetic 2003 debut, "The Decline of British Sea Power." The longest track, "True Adventures," is "only" about eight minutes long, and both the words and emotions of such tunes as "North Hanging Rock" and "Be Gone" are less cryptic than those on "Decline": No songs like "Apologies to Insect Life" here. Significant power derives from the contrasts between the carrion of layered guitars and the intimate whisper of the singer known as Yan. The free-associater will hear everything from early-'90s U2 and late-'70s Bowie to shadows of Lloyd Cole and the Kinks. Alternately literate and visceral, exuberant and melancholy and undeniably of the British Isles, BSP's finest moment here is "Please Stand Up," a natural show-starter that may be alternative/ modern rock radio's first of many excellent choices.—WR