American Music Awards

Bobby Brown In Court Over Children's Trust

A family court judge in Canton, Mass., yesterday (May 4) gave R&B singer Bobby Brown two days to prove he has the income to fund educational trusts for two of his children.

A family court judge in Canton, Mass., yesterday (May 4) gave R&B singer Bobby Brown two days to prove he has the income to fund educational trusts for two of his children.

Norfolk County Family Court Judge Paula Carey gave Brown, who lives in Georgia, until Friday to produce contracts showing he has enough income to establish the trusts. Brown, a Roxbury native, said he didn't know the payments hadn't started.

"I've been shooting a television show and recording an album, so it's hard," he said. "For me, it's easy to not know that a payment is not paid because other people are supposed to pay them."

Last year, Brown was jailed for a day after he failed to pay $63,500 in child support payments he owed Kim Ward of Stoughton. He was released after making the payment.

Brown was summoned to court in March after falling behind on his payments, said Patrick McDermott, the court's Register of Probate. By yesterday, Brown had caught up on the payments but still hadn't established the educational trusts he'd promised to set up years ago, McDermott said.

Brown, 36, told Carey he had money coming in from reality TV and music projects. He is expected to make four payments totaling $160,000 within the next six months to establish the trusts.

Brown, who lives in Alpharetta, north of Atlanta, with his wife, Whitney Houston, will be the subject of a new eight-episode reality TV show, "Being Bobby Brown," that will debut June 30 on Bravo.


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