Having toured the States numerous times in support of its Polydor/Interscope debut, "Hopes and Fears," the members of U.K. rock trio Keane are beginning to think ahead to their follow-up release. The

Having toured the States numerous times in support of its Polydor/Interscope debut, "Hopes and Fears," the members of U.K. rock trio Keane are beginning to think ahead to their follow-up release.

"I've been writing a lot on the road the last year, and I think we finally got to the point where we felt we have a lot of songs that we're very, very exited about," pianist Tim Rice-Oxley tells Billboard.com. "[But] we don't sort of want to run before we can walk and start putting out a second album before people have heard the first one."

Currently on the road in North America as part of a tour that hits Seattle tonight (May 9), Keane has started performing several new tracks, including "Nothing in Your Way," "Hamburg Song" and "Try Again." Rice-Oxley characterizes the new material as a bit more funky and rhythmic, while also remaining raw and wild.

"It's great to get out and play them for people and see what they think," Rice-Oxley says. "So far, the reaction has just been phenomenal. I really feel that after touring for 18 months, our playing has gotten much better. Our creativity has gotten much better and my songwriting has gotten a lot better as well. I don't know why, but I really feel the songs are different and somehow better."

"Hopes and Fears" continues to move copies, having already sold 656,000 units in the United States, according to Nielsen SoundScan. The single "Somewhere Only We Know" recently peaked at No. 11 on Billboard's Adult Top 40 chart.

Prior to its recent return to the States, Keane laid down a few tracks in the studio in hopes finishing the album by Christmas for a spring 2006 street date.

There's also talk of multiple DVDs coming out of the Keane camp, the first of which is expected to be a concert film from the current tour that could be out by the end of the year. Intrigued by the rawness and honesty of Metallica's "Some Kind of Monster" documentary, Rice-Oxley says the band hopes to document its upcoming recording sessions for a behind-the-scenes snapshot specially designed for diehard fans.

"It's great to see a band live but whenever I get a DVD of a band, I kind of skip straight to that sort of tour documentary, behind-the-scenes stuff because what you really want to know is what they are like as people and how they write songs and how they make music," Rice-Oxley says. "I don't know if I'm kidding myself that people will be interested, but we would love to have a documentary with very thorough and exhaustive information for people to get their hands on and find out more about the band."

Questions? Comments? Let us know: @billboard

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