Four months after the release of its sophomore RCA album, "Aha Shake Heartbreak," the members of Kings Of Leon are already hard at work on its follow-up, turning downtime while touring into creative i

Four months after the release of its sophomore RCA album, "Aha Shake Heartbreak," the members of Kings Of Leon are already hard at work on its follow-up, turning downtime while touring into creative inspiration.

"Every time we get back on the road, it just kind of starts to come out of us and I will say that I know of a couple of tracks that are pretty mind-blowing to me," singer/guitarist Caleb Followill tells Billboard.com. "One track in particular ["Celebrate"], I feel strongly about. Hopefully, now that that's out of the way, we can base the rest of the record around that. The hardest thing is just figuring out when we can do it."

Having just ended its stint as the opener for U2's spring American tour and currently touring as a headliner in the U.K., where the Tennessee-based act has a considerably larger following than Stateside, Kings Of Leon will return home in mid-July to begin a month's worth of co-headlining dates with Secret Machines.

"We're fans of their music and fans of what they're trying to do," Followill says. "So yeah, we figured if we're going to have the opportunity to be able to play in front of people in America finally, then we might as well bring along bands that inspire us to play good every night."

While the quartet is shying away from performing any of its new material in the U.K., fearing its zealous fan base will post the track on the Internet mere hours later, Followill hints American audiences may get a surprise here and there.

As far as additional touring legs for "Aha Shake Heartbreak," which has sold nearly 117,000 copies in the United States, according to Nielsen SoundScan, the 23-year-old singer says the band expects to launch another U.S. run in the fall to hit college towns. Afterward, the band will retreat to the studio, with a hopeful 2006 street date for its third album.

"It's day-to-day," Followill says. "One day you wake up and you're so excited about what's going on and then one day you wake up and you're having a sh*tty day and you're thinking, 'Man, it sucks. Bands like the Jets and Franz Ferdinands, those people went out there and sold their records really quickly so they could afford to say, 'F*** it. We're going to go and rest and take three years to make our next album.' But we don't feel like we need three years to make an album. We feel like we kind of want to strike when the iron is hot."

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