Death Cab, Widespread Bring Lollapalooza To A Close

Death Cab For Cutie previewed material from its forthcoming major-label debut and jam band Widespread Panic performed two separate sets yesterday (July 24) to close out the second night of Lollapalooz

Death Cab For Cutie previewed material from its forthcoming major-label debut and jam band Widespread Panic performed two separate sets yesterday (July 24) to close out the second night of Lollapalooza in Chicago, the first time the 1990s touring festival has been held as a single-city event. Sunday's attendance equaled that of Saturday's with 33,000 people, according to a festival spokesperson.

The spokesperson declined to comment on what the capacity for the event was, but a 2001 performance by Radiohead in the same location drew a sell-out crowd of 50,000. Lollapalooza was canceled in 2004 due to poor ticket sales.

The Chicago event was produced by Capital Sports & Entertainment and Charles Attal Presents -- the brain trust behind the successful Austin City Limits festival -- along with Lollapalooza owners the William Morris Agency and Perry Farrell.

Other artists performing Sunday included the reunited Dinosaur Jr., rock act of the moment the Killers, indie rock success story Spoon, Chicago house maven Derrick Carter and theatrical rockers the Arcade Fire. Farrell introduced the latter, declaring the Arcade Fire had "proved in this day and age you can still be original and fantastic and revered."

PerryLater, Farrell noted that Widespread Panic was the first act he thought of for Lollapalooza 2005. In turn, the group was rewarded with 150 minutes of set time, nearly double what any other act enjoyed.

Lollapalooza on Sunday sometimes felt closer to a jam band event than the multi-genre, eclectic sort of festival it was known as throughout much of the '90s. Saturday also saw performances from Blue Merle, G. Love and Special Sauce, Sound Tribe Sector 9 and Farrell's new rock/funk/electronic collective Satellite Party, which featured Extreme guitarist Nuno Bettencourt, No Doubt bassist Tony Kanal and percussionist Gabriele Corcos.

Everyone, however, was preoccupied with the weather. The temperature was said to have hit 104 degrees, Chicago's first day in triple-digits in nearly six years. With the excessive heat, bottled water was handed out for free for a brief time, and city buses were brought in to run idle with the air-conditioning running, allowing concertgoers a place to rest out of the sun.

Still, Syd Ghaewski with ATI Ambulance, which provided first aid care for the fest, said only four people needed to be taken to the hospital for heat exhaustion. She added the Warped Tour, also held in Chicago on Saturday, generated an "obscene amount" of heat exhaustion cases by comparison. "This here is a pretty well-behaved crowed," she said.