When Gwen Stefani takes the stage during New York Fashion Week, she won't be belting out chart-topping songs. Instead, she'll be showing off belts from her fashion line, among other things.

When Gwen Stefani takes the stage during New York Fashion Week, she won't be belting out chart-topping songs. Instead, she'll be showing off belts from her fashion line, among other things.

The spring collection of L.A.M.B. features sweet floral frocks in prints of wisteria and chrysanthemums, and there'll be hard-core, edgy details like padlocks and chains, too. L.A.M.B., which stands for Love, Angel, Music, Baby, makes its debut on the runway Sept. 16, the finale of eight days of fashion previews for spring 2006. It's the same slot that Jennifer Lopez's Sweetface collection filled last season.

Stefani says she's not jumping on the celebrity fashion designer bandwagon for a quick ride. Others planning collections in the coming months are Beyonce, Jessica Simpson and possibly even Justin Timberlake. Diddy launched his Sean John line in 1998 and won a Council of Fashion Designers of America award last year.

What she hopes will set her apart from the crowd is her attention to detail. "L.A.M.B. is a fashion line that -- fingers crossed -- will just get more and more sophisticated," Stefani says. "What's different than what's out there is the way I put things together. And, if you look inside the pants, you'll find secret details in there."

Stefani says she's learning to navigate the bumps of the industry, including production delays and expensive fabrics, and that she's ready for some criticism from fashion editors and retail buyers after her big show. She's getting help from designer Zaldy and creative consultant Andrea Lieberman.

"I don't expect to fit in right away but I do sense that the fashion world is rooting for me, too. I'm not being treated like a celebrity wannabe fashion designer. But even if I was, it doesn't really matter because I'm doing this for me ... but it does feel really good when you have a hit," Stefani says.

L.A.M.B., which is priced like other contemporary designer collections mostly in the $100-$300 range, is in its sixth season. There's now a secondary line filled of Japanese technopop novelty items called Harajuku Lovers.

"Music and fashion, it all comes from the same place of creativity," Stefani says. "I don't see why any musician who has style or pays attention to style couldn't do it [fashion]. It's an extension of my personality. I can't explain why I like it, it's just always been that way for me -- like pizza."


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