CocoRosie consists of two sisters, Bianca and Sierra Casady, who spent much time apart throughout their lives but reconvened after both discovering a knack for avant-garde traditions.

CocoRosie consists of two sisters, Bianca and Sierra Casady, who spent much time apart throughout their lives but reconvened after both discovering a knack for avant-garde traditions. Last year's haunting debut, "La Maison de Mon Reve," was recorded in a Paris apartment and received modest critical acclaim. Befriending notable indie champions like Conor Oberst of Bright Eyes and Antony also helped their exposure, as they spent much time on the road with them last year.

"Noah's Ark" picks up where "La Maison" left off, except this time the Casady sisters are heading down more abstract terrain. Their political feminist musings still pop up, as on "Beautiful Boyz" (backed by Antony), but overall it's rather tough to get a grip on what they're getting at. But to try and figure out CocoRosie isn't productive: this is a group that combines the harp with toddler toys, cell phones and beat boxes within the same song.

"Brazilian Sun" and "Bear Hides and Buffalo" see more of Bianca's opera training being explored, albeit backed by Devendra Banhart and barnyard animals. Ultimately, "Noah's Ark" is a logical step in CocoRosie's direction -- more abstract exploration of melodies, vocal pairings and sound arrangements. In doing so, the group is carving out its own niche as "artists" as oppose to just ordinary musicians.

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