Franz Ferdinand's sophomore album, "You Could Have It So Much Better" (Domino), arrived at No. 1 on the new U.K. chart yesterday (Oct. 9). The only other new entry in the top 10 of the album chart saw

Franz Ferdinand's sophomore album, "You Could Have It So Much Better" (Domino), arrived at No. 1 on the new U.K. chart yesterday (Oct. 9). The only other new entry in the top 10 of the album chart saw a remarkable first-ever appearance on that list for 64-year-old Canadian veteran Paul Anka.

Franz Ferdinand's self-titled debut album charted in February 2004 and never reached No. 1, peaking at No. 3. But this week, as its successor opens at the top, "Franz Ferdinand" begins a 74th week on the chart at No. 57, and is certified quadruple platinum (1.2 million shipments).

Anka's "Rock Swings" (Globe), a collection of rock hits covered in swing style, opened his U.K. album chart account 48 years after he hit the British singles chart on the way to No. 1 with "Diana" in the summer of 1957. He went on to have 14 more U.K. hits, six of them top 10s, the last of them "(You're) Having My Baby" in 1974, but has never made the album chart until now. "Rock Swings" has the further distinction of charting higher than Parlophone/EMI's new collection "Working Class Hero -- The Definitive John Lennon," which entered at No. 11.

Nickelback's "All The Right Reasons" (Roadrunner) opened at No. 13, followed by New Order's "Singles" retrospective (London) at No. 14. But there were some notable under-performers on the new chart, with British R&B rapper Ms. Dynamite's "Judgement Days," the follow-up to her Mercury Music Prize-winning 2002 set "A Little Deeper," limping in at No. 43, a week after its first single "Judgement Day" debuted at No. 25. Cream's "Royal Albert Hall 2005" (Reprise), commemorating its reunion shows at the famous venue in May, started at No. 61.

On the singles chart, Sugababes started a second week at the top with "Push the Button" (Universal Island) and prevented Robbie Williams from making his expected start at No. 1 with "Tripping" (Chrysalis). That's the first release from his new album, "Intensive Care," which comes out Oct. 24 in the United Kingdom.

The enduringly popular Depeche Mode scored its 14th British top 10 hit with "Precious" (Mute) at No. 4. Taken from the album "Playing the Angel," out Oct. 17, it's the 41st U.K. chart single for the pioneering electro band, which first hit the top 10 in October 1981 with "Just Can't Get Enough."

Bloc Party's "Two More Years" (Wichita), a new song not featured on its hit debut album "Silent Alarm" (although it will be stripped onto a fresh version of it from next week) debuted at No. 7. Mariah Carey's double-sided "Get Your Number" and "Shake It Off" (Def Jam) arrived at No. 9. Ricky Martin's "I Don't Care" (Sony BMG) started at No. 11, followed by Rachel Stevens' "I Said Never Again (But Here We Are)" (Polydor) at No. 12, James Blunt's "High" (Atlantic) at No. 16 and the Prodigy's "Voodoo People"/"Out of Space" (XL Recordings) at No. 20.

The Blunt track is a reissue of the previous single from his multi-platinum "Back to Bedlam" album, before his breakthrough with "You're Beautiful" (which moves back 40-33 in its 19th chart week).

Bon Jovi's "Have a Nice Day" (Mercury/Island) is in a second week at the top of Billboard's European Top 100 Albums chart, while "Don't Cha" (A&M/Universal) by Pussycat Dolls featuring Busta Rhymes is No. 1 for a fourth week on the Eurochart Hot 100 Singles roundup.