Voletta Wallace has never been shy to speak out about her son Christopher, better known to million as rap icon Notorious B.I.G.

Voletta Wallace has never been shy to speak out about her son Christopher, better known to million as rap icon Notorious B.I.G. Since the artist's 1997 murder, which remains unsolved, Wallace has aggressively raised questions about possible complicity on the part of record executives and suggested that there may have been a police cover-up.

In her newly penned memoir/tribute, "Biggie," which hits stores this week, Wallace not only challenges the behavior of her son's security guards in the minutes following his fatal shooting, but also criticizes prominent members of the rap world, including Sean "Diddy" Combs and the recently incarcerated Kimberly "Lil' Kim" Jones.

"My son was part of a high-stakes game and didn't know the rules," she writes. "I'm glad he does not have to witness that the very people that he thought he could ride and die with wouldn't think twice about using his mother. I'm glad he doesn't have to know that they wouldn't think twice about exploiting his children."

Wallace remains involved in building Biggie's legacy, including contributing to the upcoming star-studded Bad Boy album, "Duets: The Final Chapter." "I'm very, very happy about the CD," she tells the Book Standard. "The artists that I wanted came on. Ever since my son passed away I wanted Jay-Z to be a part of it and Jay-Z came forward. There's a lot of energy on it and it's going to be good."

Wallace also reached out to the mother of fellow late rapper Tupac Shakur, Biggie's chief hip-hop rival during their respective lifetimes, to secure a Tupac contribution for the disc.

Asked if she believes the two rappers had a lot in common, she replies, "They were musicians; they were artists; they were poets; they were family people. So yes, they had a lot in common."

In "Biggie," Wallace describes hearing her son's voice on the radio for the first time, before she had any idea how talented of a rapper he was.

"Earlier, I told him, 'You never knew music, and I thought, 'How is he going to be a musician when he never knew music?,'" she recalls. "But when I heard the music behind his voice, it sounded beautiful and I was proud of him. I thought, 'Okay, this is the beginning of his life. Maybe he had something -- maybe he knew something that I never knew."

Although she declined to reveal specifics, Wallace says the next Biggie release after "Duets" will be a collection of the artist's biggest hits.

Click here for an excerpt from "Biggie."

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