On the heels of her 2004 Re-Invention tour, which grossed $125 million, Madonna tells Billboard she is mulling another round of live dates. "I'm currently exploring the possibility," she says. "If I g

On the heels of her 2004 Re-Invention tour, which grossed $125 million, according to Billboard Boxscore, Madonna tells Billboard she is mulling another round of live dates. "I'm currently exploring the possibility," she says. "If I go on tour, it would be next summer. And it would be all out disco, with lots of disco balls. I would focus on dance music and the new record. I already did the older stuff on my Re-Invention tour."

That new record, "Confessions on a Dance Floor," arrives Nov. 15 via Warner Bros. First single "Hung Up" is No. 1 this week on Billboard's Hot Dance Airplay chart and No. 21 on the Hot 100. On Monday (Nov. 7) and Wednesday, the song will be featured in episodes of "CSI: Miami" and "CSI: NY," respectively.

The 12-track album was inspired by the many remixes Madonna's songs have received over the years. "Whenever I make records, I often like the remixes better than the original versions," she says. "So, I thought, screw that. I'm going to start from that perspective."

In tandem with producer Stuart Price, Madonna took her music back to the place where she first made her mark in the early '80s: the clubs. But they did so in a way that, while wickedly retro, pushes the beats and rhythms into the future.

"Our intention was to give a nod and a wink to people like Giorgio Moroder and the Bee Gees," Madonna says. "Stuart and I didn't want to remake the past, but make it into something new."

In signature fashion, Madonna has not escaped controversy with "Confessions." Album track "Isaac" has drawn the ire of some rabbis and religious scholars, who claimed the song is about 16th-century Jewish mystic/Kaballah scholar Yitzhak Luria.

Madonna only sighs. "You do appreciate the absurdity of a group of rabbis in Israel claiming that I'm being blasphemous about someone when they haven't even heard the record, right?" she wonders aloud. "It's interesting how their minds work, those naughty rabbis," she adds, with a twinkle in her eyes.

According to Madonna, "Isaac" -- which is about letting go of and tackling your fears -- is named after Yitzhak Sinwani, the track's featured vocalist who sings in Yemenite. Madonna, who needed a title for the song, decided to simply go with the English translation of Sinwani's Hebrew first name.

Questions? Comments? Let us know: @billboard

Print