Three weeks removed from finishing the recording of Hawthorne Heights' sophomore release, "If Only You Were Lonely," drummer Eron Bucciarelli tells Billboard.com the album is a refinement of everythin

Three weeks removed from finishing the recording of Hawthorne Heights' sophomore release, "If Only You Were Lonely," drummer Eron Bucciarelli tells Billboard.com the album is a refinement of everything found on its 2004 Victory debut, "The Silence in Black and White." That set has sold 589,000 copies in the United States, according to Nielsen SoundScan.

"I'd say it's a little bit more mature," Bucciarelli says. "The transitions in songs are smoother and sound more natural. We played a lot with just like making a verse real quiet so when we get to the chorus, it's like 'Bam,' and hits you like a train. We worked a lot on dynamics."

The new album is due Feb. 28, and Bucciarelli says the band already has three songs in mind for potential singles: "Saying Sorry," "Pens and Needles" and "This is Who We Are." The latter track is getting stage time during Hawthorne Heights' current headlining tour, which plays tonight (Nov. 10) in Albuquerque, N.M.

Bucciarelli says fans should look back to an acoustic version of the "Silence" track "Silver Bullet" (which can be found on an expanded DVD/CD edition of that set) as the impetus for certain elements of the new album.

"That acoustic version has like a Death Cab For Cutie vibe to it -- more mellow and [with] and piano and acoustic guitar," Bucciarelli says. "We did a new song ('December') like that, so that might surprise some people, but I think for anybody who is a big fan of ours, they'll know that we've done stuff like that before."

Hawthorne Heights is eyeing both a U.K. run and a tour of secondary U.S. markets early next year, in advance of its run supporting Fall Out Boy's spring jaunt. That run is expected to begin in March.

"That'll be probably the biggest tour we've done," Bucciarelli says of the latter. "I think all of the guys would rather play to people that aren't specifically coming to see us because [then] we're exposing new people to our music. So we'd rather play to the fan base of a bigger band and win some of their fans over than just continuously play to our fan base and not grow."