Guitarist Link Wray Dies At 76

Guitarist Link Wray, who was said to have invented the power chord, the major modus operandi of modern rock guitarists, has died in Copenhagen.

Guitarist Link Wray, who was said to have invented the power chord, the major modus operandi of modern rock guitarists, has died in Copenhagen. He was 76. A native of Dunn, N.C., Wray's style is considered the blueprint for heavy metal and punk music.

The artist died on Nov. 5 and was buried Nov. 18 at Copenhagen's Christian Church, according to his official Web site, which did not reveal the cause of death.

Wray is best known for his 1958 instrumental "Rumble," 1959's "Rawhide" and 1963's "Jack the Ripper." His music has appeared in movies such as "Pulp Fiction," "Independence Day" and "Desperado."

His style is said to have inspired many other rock musicians, including Pete Townsend of the Who. David Bowie, Bob Dylan, Steve Van Zandt and Bruce Springsteen have also been quoted as saying that Wray and "Rumble" inspired them to become musicians.

According to Wray's site, he invented the fuzz tone by deliberately punching holes in his amplifier speakers. In 2002, Guitar World magazine elected him one of the 100 greatest guitarists of all time.

Wray, known for his trademark black leather jacket, gave his last performance in July in Glendale, Calif. He is survived by his wife and son.


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