The Icelandic ladies of Amina are like musical sorceresses wielding an array of instruments.

The Icelandic ladies of Amina are like musical sorceresses wielding an array of instruments.

The quartet, best-known as the string section and supporting group for post-rock act Sigur Rós, draws from an arsenal including table harps, bells, glockenspiels, vibraphone, music box, glassophone (which is, in essence, wine glass-playing), harmonium and Iceland's native skranjolin during live performances.

Carving out delicate melodies and loops, the act's wintry songs do not climax so much as exhale. Amina's first EP, "AnimaminA," feels like a sample of things to come, with four creative, lofty and pretty instrumentals. The band expects to finish production on a full-length by the end of January, as well as expand its taste for unorthodox instrumentation.

"We're pretty greedy when it comes to instruments," member Sólrun Sumarlidadóttir says. "It's more about getting our hands on them than formally learning."