An upcoming four-day music and film event in New York is being touted as the biggest Earth Day (April 22) celebration in the United States. The inaugural Green Apple Music & Arts festival will get

An upcoming four-day music and film event in New York is being touted as the biggest Earth Day (April 22) celebration in the United States. The inaugural Green Apple Music & Arts festival will get underway on April 20 with the sixth annual The inaugural Green Apple Music & Arts festival will get underway on April 20 with the sixth annual Jammy Awards and will continue through April 23 in 20 venues throughout the city.

Although participating artists have not yet been announced, organizers Peter Shapiro and Relix magazine promise 50 shows ranging from rock, blues, folk and world music. Concerts will be held at such venues as Carnegie Hall, Irving Plaza, the Blue Note, B.B. King's, Nokia Theater, the Bitter End, the Bowery Ballroom and the Knitting Factory. Details will be listed on Greenapplemusicfestival.com.

The Jammys are scheduled to take place at the Theater at Madison Square Garden. The event will include an all-star tribute to Frank Zappa, who will be posthumously honored with the Lifetime Achievement Award.

"The Green Apple Music & Arts Festival was created to raise the visibility and awareness of Earth Day," says Shapiro, who owned the environmentally focused New York venue Wetlands Preserve. "What better way to celebrate Earth Day than to bring it to every major music venue in New York?"

The festival is being put together in conjunction with the non-profit Earth Day New York. That organization will stage its annual EarthFair April 21-22 outside of the city's Grand Central Terminal, which will also feature free family entertainment and musical performances.

Additionally, the film festival will be held April 23 at the American Museum of Natural History and a series of children's events is being planned.

Throughout the Green Apple Music & Arts Festival, attendees will receive information on environmental issues and causes at each venue.

If things go well, Shapiro and Relix intend to stage the festival in multiple cities in the future. "We want to spread awareness to people who aren't already environmental experts," adds Relix president/publisher Steven Bernstein. "We want to make them aware of what they can do in their daily routine that will make a difference to the environment."