Manilow May Revisit The '70s For Next Album

As he prepares to unveil his musical trip through the '60s, Barry Manilow predicts that a similar visit to the '70s is inevitable. "Well, it seems like there should be one," says Manilow, who releases

As he prepares to unveil his musical trip through the '60s, Barry Manilow predicts that a similar visit to the '70s is inevitable. "Well, it seems like there should be one," says Manilow, who releases "The Greatest Songs of the Sixties," his sequel to last year's chart-topping "The Greatest Songs of the Fifties," on Oct. 31. "It all depends on whether [the new CD] is a hit record. And if it is, I would imagine Clive [Davis] and Arista would say, 'Let's go for the '70s.'"

The tricky part of that, Manilow acknowledges, is that the '70s was a decade when he enjoyed his greatest success as an artist, meaning that he'd likely be recording songs that were chart companions to his own hits. "I can't ignore that," he says, "but I do have an idea of how I would tackle that. But I have to talk to Clive about it."

On "...Sixties," Manilow covers 13 songs by the Beatles, Burt Bacharach, Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley, Jackie DeShannon, the Righteous Brothers, Dean Martin and others. The set's first single is Frankie Valli's "Can't Take My Eyes Off You," while Manilow recruited the Association to join him for a medley of its hits "Cherish" and "Windy."

Manilow has another Halloween treat for fans; "First & Farewell," a two-disc DVD that features footage from rehearsals for his first-ever headlining tour in 1974 and his 2004 farewell tour performance at the Pond in Anaheim. These days Manilow performs almost exclusively at the Las Vegas Hilton, but he's quietly returning to the road for select engagements rather than full-fledged tours.

"I'm not touring; I can't do that anymore, but we're doing bits and pieces," he explains. "We've put together an arena show, and every so often I will go out and do one night somewhere and then come right home. Our first night of doing that is in Atlantic City on Oct. 14, and then the following Saturday (Oct. 21) is in Chicago. And then that's it for four, five months; if we do another one, it won't be 'til January or February."