"I put every pertinent emotion I had into it," says Rosanne Cash of her new Capitol album, "Black Cadillac," a sparkling snapshot of her genealogy, accentuating her late father and American icon Johnn

"I put every pertinent emotion I had into it," says Rosanne Cash of her new Capitol album, "Black Cadillac," a sparkling snapshot of her genealogy, accentuating her late father and American icon Johnny Cash.

Cash led a genre break from traditional country music in the 1980s, first with the No. 1 country hit "Seven Year Ache" and then with a string of musing, introspective albums like 1990's "Interiors." She says "Black Cadillac" required a different type of soul-searching: "It was different because I was living with the emotions every day," she explains.

The inventive ways in which Cash handles loss, the savory gives the album its unique coloration and manifest significance. She emphasizes her own reasoning for giving the work a poetic flavor: "Because that's the way I look at the world. Maybe something else would be more important to other people, maybe they would want rationality ... But to bring poetry to sorrow is inspiration. It took a real discipline to create the poetry. It was hard not to kind of go under."

Cash reminds that "Black Cadillac" is not just a familial silhouette, but that it has a message of universalism endemic to it. "I do think the most important thing is that people do not see the album just in terms of my life you know," she says. "If I see a work of art, that reveals something to me about myself, then it is a great influence."

There are many exceptional cuts on the album, including the centerpiece "The World Unseen." Asked if it is the most important tune because of its middling position on the album, and because of lines like "I will look for you between the grooves of the songs we sing / And I will look for you in Memphis and the miles between," Cash is ambivalent. "It is a single part of a painting," she says. "You can't say it is the most important but there is a reason it is at the center of the album."

Cash is unsure of her next project, but on the subject of possibly more experimental work in the future now that this album is complete, she simply says, "I feel free to write anything."

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