Morrissey Writing a Novel, Working On New Album
Morrissey shows his autobiography during a presentation in Goteborg, Sweden on October 17, 2013. ADAM IHSEL/TT/AFP/Getty Images

Morrissey has a busy 2014 ahead. The musician announced that he is currently writing his first novel and is about to record a new album.

He takes his first foray into fiction after releasingAutobiography last year, saying the title "has been more successful than any record I have ever released." When asked by a fan whether he would ever attempt the format, he answered to the fansite True To You, "Yes, I am midway through my novel. I have my hopes."

The former Smiths frontman noted that in a way, the written platform is more satisfying than the untrustworthy music industry.

Morrissey's 'Autobiography': 10 Things We Learned About Moz

"The actuality is that radio stations will not play my music, and the majority of people have lost faith in the music industry, and it's generally assumed -- quite rightly -- that the number one chart positions are 'bought' by the major labels, so there really is no passion left in pop or rock music. And I don't think people believe for an instant that the faces we constantly see on television and in magazines are remotely popular," he reflected in the Q&A, published Jan. 2.

"It's all, now, solely a question of marketing. All success stories are safe and dreary, and you will never be taken by surprise by a hit song that sounds out of place. This is not just my view but the view of everyone I know."

Still, he also noted that "we are about to record our new album," with one track named after "Istanbul," his second favorite city in the world. "When I'm in Istanbul, I feel as if I could never die. My life is matched."

Morrissey's 'Autobiography' a Record-Breaker in Britain

He answered questions about his diet ("I see no difference between eating animals and pedophilia"), the favorite of his songs ("Life Is a Pigsty" from Ringleader of the Tormentors), overused interview questions ("As long as I'm not asked about The Smiths, I won't slip into permanent unconsciousness") and David Bowie.

"A producer (Tony Visconti), who is a very close friend of David Bowie, tried to get both Bowie and I together to do our version of 'You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin',' with David doing the deep Bill Medley parts, and me doing the Bobby Hatfield shrieks," he said. "I loved this idea, but David wouldn't budge. I know I've criticized David in the past, but it's all been snot-nosed junior high ribbing on my part. I think he knows that."

  • This article originally appeared in THR.com.

Questions? Comments? Let us know: @billboard

Print