The Crystal Method creates fast and furious beats. Live, the electronic duo's rhythmic shifts and mood swings have been known to raise heart rates.

The Crystal Method creates fast and furious beats. Live, the electronic duo's rhythmic shifts and mood swings have been known to raise heart rates. TCM masterminds Ken Jordan and Scott Kirkland surely did not create their three studio albums and two DJ mixes with the gym in mind. But that has not prevented fitness buffs, or Nike, for that matter, from embracing the duo's tough and sturdy sounds.

The fitness apparel company recently joined forces with Apple Computer to create the iPod nano-compatible Nike Air Zoom Moire running shoe, and Nike tapped TCM to create the first original workout mix for this new initiative. The 45-minute, 10-track mix, "Drive," is the first volume in the Nike+ Original Run series. It will be available June 28 on iTunes' new Nike+ Sport Music section.

Priced at $9.99, the nonstop mix intertwines new, original TCM tracks and new remixes, including the Rogue Element mix of "Bad Ass" and the original dub of "Roadhouse Blues" by the Doors vs. the Crystal Method. A bonus nonmixed version of the entire collection, minus the Doors track, comes with purchase.

Jordan acknowledges that devising a mix for runners offered some challenges. "We weren't quite sure how our breakdowns and builds would play to runners," he says. "But we tested the tracks on a few of our runner friends, and they especially liked those moments."

Additionally, Jordan says he and Kirkland were very conscious of that gray area where "workout music" becomes "too poppy and too cheesy." Kirkland adds, "With runners, there's that grit and determination where they have a goal set and that moment when you need a little extra oomph. People need that burst of energy, that kick-in-the-ass moment that gives them the motivation to keep going."

Like their contemporaries in electronic music (Gorillaz, BT, Paul Oakenfold and others), TCM fully understands the importance of thinking beyond the dancefloor. "We look at our career much differently today than when we put out our first album [1997's 'Vegas']. These days, it's about touring and albums-and TV, films and videogames," Kirkland says.

Pausing, he smiles and adds, "But this Nike project is totally off the wall. And in a way, it's setting the bar for our next album."

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