Bands like Norma Jean, Between The Buried And Me, Fear Before The March Of Flames and Misery Signals will unite together this fall for the first all-ages Radio Rebellion tour.

Bands like Norma Jean, Between The Buried And Me, Fear Before The March Of Flames and Misery Signals will unite together this fall for the first all-ages Radio Rebellion tour. Intended to showcase bands that have achieved a degree of commercial success without commercial radio airplay, the trek kicks off Oct. 6 in Nashville. The Fully Down and the Confession will alternate in the opening slot.

"This is not a 'F*ck you, radio' thing," says tour co-founder Graham Day. "We're looking to promote this niche of bands that have an insane fanbase, who are loyal and love music, in a very grassroots way, just as these bands have managed to gain a following in a grassroots way. All the bands combined [have] sold over 500,000 records without the aid of radio."

"We're looking to make premium club tour experience," he continues. "Norma Jean is one of the headliners at Ozzfest, which is great, but fans sometimes have to watch the bands from 20,000 people out. Warped Tour and Taste Of Chaos [tours] are during the other months, so October through December is the perfect time for us. "

A ticket pre-sale begins Aug. 15 via MusicToday.com and a CD sampler of the touring bands will be available at Hot Topic stores and at the remaining Warped Tour shows. The full itinerary will be announced within the next few weeks on SmartPunk.com.

"Touring with something like Ozzfest makes you feel like you're the biggest band in the world, but a club show will kill an amphitheatre show any day," says Norma Jean lead singer Cory Brandon. "We hope to make new fans, since everybody's doing something different musically with totally different fan bases. This way, we're closer to them." Norma Jean's third full-length, "Redeemer," is due Sept. 12 via Solid State.

According to Day, the tour's founders hope to tweak the musical slant of the show with each bill, so that a variety of bands can play to their voracious, young audiences.

"Fundamentally, these are bands that have done enough to earn our attention. We want to build out this same idea to different kinds of musicians, who've captured an audience online, on tour, MySpace, whatever. It's intentionally undersized and all-ages so that we can keep it small and intimate," he says. "We want the bands to feel like they've gotten something out of it."