Their album title says it all: "It's About Time" that the Jonas Brothers made their debut. The Daylight/Columbia set has been in the works for more than two-and-a-half years, and was originally suppos

Their album title says it all: "It's About Time" that the Jonas Brothers made their debut. The Daylight/Columbia set has been in the works for more than two-and-a-half years, and was originally supposed to be released this past spring.

In fact, at first the album was slated to be youngest brother Nicholas' solo project. But when Nick, now 13, and his brothers -- Joseph (16) and Kevin (18) - began submitting songs they'd written together with the intention of having them appear on his album, the label saw a new opportunity and the Jonas Brothers were born.

In March, the pop/rock trio released a three-part video for its first single, "Mandy," which found its way onto MTV's "TRL." But the song didn't garner the attention they were hoping for, so the boys went back into the studio to record a few more tracks.

The end result? An album that has struck a chord with the coveted tween market. Last week, "It's About Time" entered the Billboard 200 at No. 91. The news "makes me want to do, like, 50,000 jumping jacks," Nick tells Billboard.com.

"Even though we're young, we've been waiting for this a long time. It feels like it's been forever," he says. "The name of the album is really true, but there's a cool double meaning to it. We've got the fact that [the album] is finally out, so it's about time it came out. But also a lot of the songs on the record are about time -- like 'One Day At a Time,' 'Time For Me To Fly' and 'Year 3000.'"

In fact, "Year 3000" is the Jonas' latest single, and also one of the newer songs on the album. The track was originally written and recorded by U.K. power pop trio Busted, and reached No. 2 on the U.K. charts. Despite their own MTV2 reality show, "America or Busted," the single never caught on in the States. But now it has found a new home, along with another Busted tune, "What I Go To School For."

"We knew our fans would love them," says Nick about why the songs made the final cut. "Sometimes it takes awhile to get [an album] perfect -- or try to get it perfect, at least. I feel like the record we have now is just amazing and I'm really proud of it."

In the end, the Jonas brothers wrote or co-wrote seven of the 11 songs on the album. Since most of those were written nearly two years ago, the boys are already looking forward to working on their follow-up.

"You always have this idea when you're on the road that [once] you get a tour bus you're gonna be able to write like a million songs and it's gonna be so easy and you'll watch DVDs all the time. But that's totally not how it is," says Nick with a laugh. "Once you get on that bus you just fall asleep immediately. But we did get a few songs done and they're really cool."

Before they go back in the studio, though, the siblings have to shake their comparison to another family-oriented pop rock trio: Hanson, who is best known for the 1997 bubblegum hit "MMM Bop."

"We are honored" by the comparison, reveals Nick. "They sold like 14 million [copies] of their debut [album]. So to have anywhere near the success that they had would be amazing."

But he's also quick to point out that "our sound is much different from Hanson, even though we do get the comparison. But it's not so much from the fans. Usually the fans don't even think about it 'cause that was about 10 years ago now, and we've got some younger fans that are like, 'Who's Hanson?'"

After thinking about it for a moment, he adds, "We're not really 'the next' anybody. We're just the Jonas Brothers, and we're excited to see what comes next. We're ready for it."

Questions? Comments? Let us know: @billboard

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