Lewis & Clarke

With a sound that recalls Elliott Smith and Bonnie "Prince" Billy, Lewis & Clarke has carved out its own niche thanks to the lush arrangements of its debut, 2005's "Bare Bones and Branches."

With a sound that recalls Elliott Smith and Bonnie "Prince" Billy, Lewis & Clarke has carved out its own niche thanks to the lush arrangements of its debut, 2005's "Bare Bones and Branches."

Essentially the brainchild of singer/songwriter Lou Rogai, the Delaware Water Gap-based group's sophomore effort, "Blasts of Holy Birth," is slated for a fall/winter release on his self-distributed imprint, La Société Expéditionnaire. In Europe, it will be issued on indie Delboy Records. Rogai recently completed a DIY tour of New England, avoiding venues that wouldn't complement Lewis & Clarke's quiet sound.

"I booked all the dates myself through co-ops and art spaces and friends who may have worked at theaters," Rogai says. He also gained encouragement from the popularity of several live tracks he posted on the band's Web site in April, which he says were downloaded nearly 8,000 times in a three-day span.