"American music fans are just as musically open-minded as their British counterparts, but the powers that be in the U.S. may not be as open-minded. Which, to a degree, will hold us back in the U.S.,"

"American music fans are just as musically open-minded as their British counterparts, but the powers that be in the U.S. may not be as open-minded. Which, to a degree, will hold us back in the U.S.," Scissor Sisters frontman Jake Shears says. "Tons of Americans would love our music, but they don't know we exist."

The New York band's self-titled debut album was the best-selling album in the United Kingdom in 2004, moving 500,000 units, according to the Official U.K. Charts Co. To date, that album has sold 2.5 million copies in the United Kingdom. But on the eve of the release of the Scissor Sisters' sophomore album, "Ta-Dah" (Universal Motown), Shears and his bandmates -- Babydaddy, Ana Matronic, Del Marquis and Paddy Boom -- are still trying to crack the U.S. market.

On "Ta-Dah," you can practically see Shears strutting his stuff on tracks like "Ooh" and lead single "I Don't Feel Like Dancin'," an Elton John co-write which is already No. 1 in the United Kingdom but moving more slowly at home. And there's loads of campy fun to be found on "I Can't Decide" and "She's My Man."

"People just need to be exposed to ['Dancin'] -- and our music in general," Shears says. "They'll get it. People may look at us and think, 'What a bunch of weirdos.' But give them time and they'll see that we're pretty special."

Questions? Comments? Let us know: @billboard

Print