It may not be their very next project, but Pet Shop Boys have a different kind of dance music in mind for a future endeavor.

It may not be their very next project, but Pet Shop Boys have a different kind of dance music in mind for a future endeavor. "I think we'd quite like to write a ballet," says keyboardist Chris Lowe, who formed the group in 1981 with frontman Neil Tennant. "We've got an idea for one, and we know a ballet dancer in London who wants us to do something, so that might happen."

"They always seem to take quite awhile to come together, though. We're very good at spending a lot of time working on something that's not going to bring us financial reward," he adds with a laugh.

The ballet idea comes amidst a busy year for the Pet Shop Boys. The duo -- who are currently touring North America -- released their ninth studio album, "Fundamental," in June along with this month's U.S. release of the two-CD compilation "PopArt: The Hits" and the live DVD, "Concrete: In Concert at the Mermaid Theatre."

A book, "Catalogue," was recently published, chronicling the visual component of Pet Shop Boys' career (including CD packaging, Christmas cards and fan club materials), while England's National Portrait Gallery has commissioned an exhibit dedicated to the group.

Pet Shop Boys also remixed Madonna's hit, "Sorry," for club play and produced two songs for British superstar Robbie Williams new album -- including, ironically, his remake of the My Robot Friends' song "We are Pet Shop Boys."

"We still love creating and making music, and we're not struggling to do it," Lowe explains. "It's not difficult for us. We haven't reached a cul de sac or anything like that. And we still have a lot of music in us, I think."

Pet Shop Boys have also done film scores (for the 1925 silent film "Battleship Potemkin") and collaborated on the limited run British stage play "Closer to Heaven." But don't ever expect a "jukebox" musical crafted from the group's songs, ala ABBA's "Mama Mia" or Queen's "We Will Rock You."

"No, we don't want to do the greatest hits show," he says. "That doesn't appeal to us in any way at all -- which is a shame, 'cause that might make money."