New York rock quintet the Bravery will release its second album, "The Sun and the Moon," early next year via Island. "There's still a lot of unusual sounds on the record, but they're created more by o

New York rock quintet the Bravery will release its second album, "The Sun and the Moon," early next year via Island. Though the band made headway with its self-titled 2005 debut, which sold 335,000 copies in the United States, according to Nielsen SoundScan, and its dance-heavy single "An Honest Mistake," the new effort finds the boys coming from an earthier place.

"We did it to death a little bit. We were a little sick of it. We went so synth-crazy that it got a little boring to us," frontman Sam Endicott tells Billboard.com. "It was more like, what does an acoustic piano sounds like or what are real organ sounds? That stuff was more exciting to us. There's still a lot of unusual sounds on the record, but they're created more by organic instruments."

Now in the final days of mixing with producer Brendan O'Brien, the album is tipped to include "Shapes" (which is musically closest to the debut) and "The Ocean" (an acoustic, string quartet-backed number, dealing with distances from loved ones). Other tracks include "Believe," "Bad Sun," "Rat in the Walls" and the harder-edged "Every Word Is a Knife in My Ear."

"It's like a weird mix between the [Rolling] Stones and the Ramones, but it doesn't really sound like either of them," Endicott says of the latter number. "At its heart, it's just a punk rock, f*ck you song."

The Bravery will head out on the road next month for a South American tour, and possibly, some secret U.S. dates. Even after two years slogging it out across the world, including several grueling months in wintry Europe with Depeche Mode, Endicott says there's nothing more he would like to do than hit the road again.

"I can't speak for the other guys, but for me by the end of the [last] tour I was so much happier than I was at the beginning," he states. "At the beginning I didn't know what the f*ck I was doing. I was nervous. All the press and sh*t -- it was such a whirlwind. I was in way over my head and it freaked me out but then by the end I got used to it and I was way more comfortable and I was able to have a lot of fun with it."

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