All-American Rejects Eyeing Post-Tour Break

It looks like we won't have the All-American Rejects to kick around for awhile. Singer/bassist Tyson Ritter tells Billboard.com that after the group comes off the road from its current Tournado tour i

It looks like we won't have the All-American Rejects to kick around for awhile. Singer/bassist Tyson Ritter tells Billboard.com that after the group comes off the road from its current Tournado tour in December, "I think its gonna be another year before anybody hears from us again."

After 80 weeks of touring in support of 2005's platinum-plus "Move Along," Ritter thinks it's time for the band to take a break -- and for its fans to get a break from the band.

"I think the world needs to take a breath away from the All-American Rejects," Ritter explains. "I think people make mistakes by coming back too quick. Like the Killers, I think that was a good time that they took away. People get burnt out on sh*t easy. If you don't disappear and you're always in the spotlight, then you're just another Britney Spears, y'know?"

Despite the looming break, Ritter says he and his bandmates have been working on new material and that he's "pleasantly surprised with the songs I'm writing out here on the road."

"I think we're always gonna keep going somewhere forward in our songwriting, in our sound," Ritter says. "We definitely are a band that tries to get the biggest-sounding record out there, and we're gonna try again. But I don't anticipate it being as slick as ('Move Along'). I think it's gonna be in-between the first and second records as far as sound goes."

Ritter says some of the band members have other musical projects, but none that will impinge on All-American Rejects' schedule. He himself has extra-musical concerns he'll focus on during the time off, including some real estate holdings he has in the band's native Oklahoma and developing his clothing line, Butter, beyond the T-shirts and hoodies it currently offers.

"I want it to grow naturally," Ritter explains. "I don't want it to be completely whored-out like your Clandestine by [Fall Out Boy's] Pete Wentz. I don't want to be another guy in a band making shirts. I definitely want it to stand on its own."