Motley Crue on 'Sex' and Proving the Skeptics Wrong
Motley Crue on 'Sex' and Proving the Skeptics Wrong

Motley Crue gave the world a little more "Sex" in order to have something new to play for its current tour with Kiss. But the group isn't willing to commit to when, or even if, it will have an album's worth of new material to join it in the near future.

"It takes time to put together music," bassist Nikki Sixx tells Billboard.com. "Right now we're just writing music. There's tons of material always there -- there's riffs for days, ideas, choruses here, verses there. For us, it's how many songs have we written (and) how many do we love and what do we want to do with them? It's about finding the time to go home, be off the road, get everybody in a room and start riffing and see where it does."

Sixx isn't sure when that process -- which could result in a follow-up to 2008's "Saints of Los Angeles" -- will take place, but he says he and his mates are happy with "Sex," which was distributed free to fan club members and later sent to digital retailers, as a placeholder.

"We happened to have this song everyone was really excited about, so instead of saying, 'Let's add it to the pile of songs we have and we'll sort 'em out later,' we were, 'Hey, let's finish this one up,'" Sixx recalls. "We got it out there for the fans, for the tour, and it's exciting for the band to play something new. We love the classics and the hits, and I know the fans love that, too, but to be able to play something new is great."

He adds that the Crue went deliberately soft in promoting "Sex," without a big push for radio or video play. "We wanted to save that big push for when we do (an album)," he says, "but the way the song is connecting with people feels like the way the music used to connect with people when we were a baby band and just had our first record out. The song really seems to work."

Sixx says the tour with Kiss, which wraps Oct. 1 in Monterrey, Mexico, is going "really great" and takes the Crue back to the early 80s, when it played a handful of dates opening for Kiss at the outset of its career. And while both groups share a theatrical bent, Sixx feels that they're really different shows.

"Kiss is an extremely theatrical, well-oiled machine, and our machine is a bit more chaotic. That's the best way to explain it."

The Crue has nothing on the books yet to follow up the tour, and Sixx says a return to Las Vegas, where the band did a residency last February at The Joint in the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino, is unlikely.

"Not at this time, no," he says. "It feels good to be the first band to go in and do it, and it also feels good that we won and such a large level. When we first started talking about it, a lot of people were like, 'This is a career killer. This is going to tarnish your image forever.' And we were like, 'Why? That doesn't make any sense.' It worked, and if anything it put the focus on the fact that we're not just any band. I think there's something unique about us i the fact we're always willing to take a chance. But there's no plan to do it again right now. Whether we do it or not again, I don't know."