Woodstock At 40: The Sights, The Sounds, The Stories
Woodstock At 40: The Sights, The Sounds, The Stories

Like so many things during the latter '60s, some say if you remember Woodstock, you probably weren't there.

That may be true. And, of course, there are generations now who were too young to attend the legendary Woodstock Music & Art Fair -- or weren't even born yet. Fortunately, each decade's anniversary tends to bring with it a new batch of Woodstock-related product to help re-create the festival experience without the rain, mud, overflowing port-a-johns or Wavy Gravy screeching in your ear (brown acid is, of course, optional).

Woodstock's 40th anniversary has opened the coffers again with perhaps the most insightful and intriguing releases yet (but no Guitar Hero or Rock Band Woodstock edition. Yet.). Here's a quick overview of what's available...

THE SIGHTS

* A newly refurbished edition of the "Woodstock: 3 Days of Peace and Music" director's cut expands the original documentary -- which won the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature and was assistant directed by Martin Scorsese -- with two additional hours of performance footage, including groups such as Creedence Clearwater Revival who weren't in the theatrical release. It also includes new interviews with festival principals and artists, as well as a spotlight on The Museum at Bethel Woods. A Woodstock 40th Anniversary Ultimate Collector's Edition also includes memorabilia such as ticket replicas and comes packaged in a fringed suede box.

* The Barbara Kopple-directed documentary "Woodstock: Now & Then," executive produced by festival organizer MIchael Lang, premiers at 9 p.m. Aug. 14 on VH1 and VH1 Classic and 8 p.m. EST Aug. 17 on the History Channel. The two-hour special features archival footage as well as current interviews with performers and festival attendees and is expected to be released on DVD at a later date.

* On the big screen, director Ang Lee's "Taking Woodstock" opens Aug. 28 and tells the story of Greenwich Village interior designer Elliot Tiber who helps bring the festival to Bethel, N.Y., in an effort to help the sagging economic fortunes of the area -- including his family's El Monaco motel. Demetri Martin stars as Tiber while Eugene Levy portrays the late Max Yasgur's, whose farmland played host to the Woodstock Nation.

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