Beatles Boost Music Game Sales To New High
The Beatles circa 1969.

Back in 1964, Beatles publicist Derek Taylor predicted that "the kids of AD 2000" would still dig the Fab Four. "For the magic of the Beatles is, I suspect, timeless and ageless... It is adored by the world." When Taylor made this claim -- in the liner notes of "Beatles for Sale" -- AD 2000 was more than 35 years away. The magic of the Beatles was just 2 years old, at least on record, and the idea of a rock band finding an audience behind the Iron Curtain, let alone in China, must have seemed like a stretch. How could so many people agree on one band?

Forty-five years later -- almost a decade after the millennium -- Taylor's prediction still sounds bold. The magic of the Beatles isn't legally available on the Internet, the medium that really does bring the world together. With hundreds of channels and thousands of Web sites, how can so many people agree on one band?

And yet the music of the Beatles is still adored by the world -- to a degree that might surprise anyone who has written off the idea of mass media for a mass audience. The Beatles' "1" is the best-selling album of the decade so far, with 11.5 million copies sold, according to Nielsen SoundScan. The band has sold 28.2 million albums since 2000, second only to Eminem (with 32 million), who they could well pass before the end of the year. Last month a Pew Research survey revealed that the Beatles are one of the most popular acts among all age groups. Paul McCartney spent the summer playing stadiums, the Beatles' "Rock Band" videogame made the cover of the New York Times Magazine, and the "9-9-09" reissues of the group's catalog will be among the best-selling albums of the fall.

"It's staggering, isn't it?" McCartney says just before he takes the stage in Tulsa, Okla., sounding genuinely surprised that his old band could be the best-selling act of the decade.

The Beatles Rock Band

Click the image above to read about how the Fab Four finally went digital thanks to "Rock Band."

The Beatles Remake Abbey Road

Click the image above to go deep into the effort behind remastering all the original Beatles albums.

There were times when some of the Beatles themselves seemed to disagree with Taylor's assessment of their enduring appeal -- John Lennon famously sang, "I don't believe in Beatles." But McCartney never stopped valuing the band's legacy, which he guards carefully. Most recently, he approved the remastering for the "9-9-09" reissues and helped make "The Beatles: Rock Band" as accurate as possible, down to the color of the walls in Liverpool's famous Cavern Club. He also spent some of the summer thinking about Beatles songs -- which make up about half his set -- and he says they've never sounded better than they do on the reissues. "It sounds," he says, "like we were in the room."I saw you play a few weeks ago in New York and it looked like you were having the time of your life.

Do you still get the same charge out of performing that you used to?

It's been feeling very good at the moment. Because we're not flogging away on a great big tour-we're picking and choosing certain dates, some of which are events like the opening of Citi Field [in New York]-they're special events. We've got plenty of time between them to hang, so we're almost combining it with a holiday. And the band's playing great. Also, the audiences are super fab. They're going bananas. We haven't been around too much, so they're not fed up with us yet.

You're playing some Beatles songs just as the remasters are about to come out. Does that bring back memories?

I always do songs I want to play and also songs the audience wants to hear. I think it's interesting, when you have some time to consider things. I was talking to people at dinner the other night and they'd heard about the show or seen it and [we started talking about] the significance of the Beatles politically. So many people, in America particularly, come up to me and say, "You changed my life."

This whole idea of the significance of the Beatles is incredible. Someone mentioned the Russian thing-the bringing down of the Iron Curtain. That was the whole ethos behind rock music-we just happened to symbolize it because we were possibly the most visible. It's not often that that kind of a thing has such a global influence. We were lucky because we were at a time of global communications-TV and records and radio were stretching through borders. And the other day I was doing a bit of yoga and the yoga teacher said, "I have to thank you and the guys-I wouldn't be doing this if it weren't for the Beatles." I feel that more as time goes on.

I don't know if you know this, but the Beatles' "1" is probably going to be the best-selling album of the decade in the United States, according to Nielsen SoundScan, and the Beatles might be the best-selling act.

Wow. I'm staggered.

I think the "1" album had a lot to do with that. When that was out, I was noticing people coming up to me and saying, "My kids are going crazy over the '1' album." And you were getting the 7-year-olds! I listened to it-we got it ready before we put it out but that was for the business things-and the word I came up with was "structure." It seemed to be well-structured. There didn't seem to be anything on the record that shouldn't be there. Kids can see that same structure in it that adults do and the kids who originally bought the records felt. But it's amazing.

Questions? Comments? Let us know: @billboard

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