Shwayze Brings Bigger Sound On 'Let It Beat'

Shwayze performs during The Dome 47 music show at the SAP Arena on August 29, 2008 in Mannheim, Germany. 

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With no TV reality show to flog them this time, the duo of Shwayze and Cisco Adler are hoping the new Shwayze album, "Let It Beat," will bring them a greater kind of musical credibility.

"We want people to know this is a career band," Adler tells Billboard.com. "We don't want to be the group that made that one song ('Buzzin') they listened to that summer (2008). The reality show was our launch pad for this act; it was, 'OK, we're confident in our music and confident enough that we are musicians first. Now it's nice to just settle back into the role of being musicians and making a record and going on tour with it."

Shwayze (ne Aaron Smith), adds that "we really wanted to take the next step. People who have heard a song or two maybe have some sort of pre-conceived thing about us. Those are the haters...the people who want you to have a sophomore slump. But I don't think that's gonna be it for us."

Adler says he sought to make Shwayze's sound "bigger" on "Let It Beat" than they were on last year's Top 10 debut "Shwayze," especially the drums and rhythm tracks. The group also broadened its stylistic reach on the album; the first single, "Get U Home," has a more thumping, club kind of feel, while "Crazy For You," a collaboration with the Cars' Ric Ocasek and with Bad Brains' Darryl Jenifer on bass, has more of a New Wave-style rock flavor and "Heart and Soul," with the E Street Band's Roy Bittan on piano, is a full-on ballad.
Other features on "Let It Beat" include Snoop Dogg on "Livin' It Up" and the Knux on "Dirty Little Girl."

Shwayze is on tour until Oct. 10 to promote the "Get U Home" single. The duo will then hit the road again with LMFAO starting Oct. 19 and finishing Dec. 20. After the holidays Shwayze and Adler will get in front of the cameras again, this time to make their feature film debut in "Get Jack's Tickets," directed by Nicholaus Goossen ("Grandma's Boy," "The Shortcut"). "It's a comedy about us trying to get Jack Nicholson's tickets on the (Los Angeles) Lakers floor," Shwayze says. "It's like a different chapter of the same thing, and by no means are we gonna give up music for (acting). And we'll definitely probably do the soundtrack."

"We're musicians first," adds Adler. "We happened to end up on TV to spread the word about our (music). Now we're gonna sort of add to that real and make a really funny, big movie that's gonna be hilarious."