MIchael Buble Adds More 'Love'
Ben Watts

Michael Buble plans to give fans another dose of "Crazy Love" in 2010.

The Canadian singer tells Billboard.com that he plans to reissue the album -- which spent its f irst two weeks at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 and currently sits at No. 7 -- next year and add some of the other songs he recorded during the sessions. Among those will be "Hollywood Dead," which will be "Crazy Love's" third single after "Have I Met You" and "Hold On."

"That's probably the best pop song I've ever been part of," says Buble, who co-wrote the track with Toronto songwriter Robert Scott. "It's kind of like our take on the culture of celebrity and how f--ked up it is and how people lose their way in the hunt for fame...It's just one of those things saying, 'If you're gonna go for it, don't give everything up for it. Remember where you came from...You need to remember what you asked for when you get it."

Another candidate for the expanded version of the album is "The End of May" by a group called The Actual Tigers, which Buble says "is so beautiful I can't even tell you. I think it might be one of the best vocal performances I've ever given...If I could go back I probably would have replaced something (on the album) with this song."

A release date for the new edition of "Crazy Love" has not yet been determined and will depend on the life of "Hold On" at radio. Meanwhile, Buble is gearing up for his world tour in support of the album, which begins during March in North America and will last into 2011. He plans to play mostly in arenas and is currently working with production designers from the late Michael Jackson's planned This Is It shows in London.

"I'm gonna have a huge production, yeah," Buble says, "but I do not want to rely on lasers or pyrotechnics or a set to make my show entertaining. I think a good entertainer should be able to have a stool and a microphone and a glass of water and you should be able to entertain people. I think all the production should be a bonus. What I want to create is intimacy. You're playing an arena and it can be so cavernous and cold; I want to make it really intimate. That's the most important thing."

Questions? Comments? Let us know: @billboard

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