On Fall Out Boy's new album, "Infinity on High," due this week from Island, the first voice one hears is that of hip-hop impresario Jay-Z. And when it came time to shop for a producer, Fall Out Boy tu

On Fall Out Boy's new album, "Infinity on High," due this week from Island, the first voice one hears is that of hip-hop impresario Jay-Z. And when it came time to shop for a producer, Fall Out Boy turned to R&B hitmaker Babyface, among others. Welcome to the world of Fall Out Boy, where the line between schtick and reality has been blurred to the tune of more than 3 million albums sold since the act's 2003 debut for indie Fueled by Ramen.

As Fall Out Boy drifts further from its hardcore punk roots to write increasingly accessible pop tunes, the band never stops taking a swipe at its own pedestal, constantly laughing at the absurdity of its own actions. With no intent to hide its bid for mainstream acceptance, Fall Out Boy maintains a level of indie credibility, allowing fans to believe they're in on the joke.

First single "This Ain't a Scene, It's an Arms Race" recently debuted at No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100, the highest bow for a band since radio-only titles joined the chart in December 1998.

"A lot of times, bands get really big and start to overthink things and do things to make themselves look good to other musicians," vocalist Patrick Stump says. "A friend of mine said, 'But aren't you dumbing it down?' This is going to sound like I'm joking, but you're not dumbing it down if you're not that smart to begin with."

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