Nick Cave will be a busy man in the coming months, as he prepares to release the self-titled debut from his band Grinderman and gets to work on the next release from his long-running outfit the Bad Se

Nick Cave will be a busy man in the coming months, as he prepares to release the self-titled debut from his band Grinderman and gets to work on the next release from his long-running outfit the Bad Seeds. First up is the Grinderman disc, due April 10 via Anti-, which finds Cave backed by Bad Seeds members Warren Ellis, Martyn Casey and Jim Sclavunos.

"Grinderman is low on personnel, the songs are short, the album is short," Cave tells Billboard.com. "And, I play guitar." The group will make its live debut in late April at the All Tomorrow's Parties festival in England, but has yet to commit to additional performances. "If we can do [that show] with a minimum of fuss, then there's no reason we couldn't book dates," Cave says. "But to go on some huge tour would probably defeat the purpose of it in some way."

Plus, Cave has begun conceptualizing the follow-up to the Bad Seeds' 2004 double-disc set "Abattoir Blues/The Lyre of Orpheus," which he plans to record in July. "I've been working on it for about three weeks," he says of the as-yet-untitled album. "I feel like something's about to happen. What? I'm not really quite sure. There's a certain type of music I'd like to make, and that's just raising its head, so I wouldn't like to talk to much about it."

When it comes time to play his ideas to the rest of the Bad Seeds, Cave says he puts himself through a grueling process of show and tell. "I sit down at a piano and they stand around," he says. "That's quite nerve-wracking, actually. You play a song and there's this sort of silence afterward. It's not like, 'Hey! That's cool!'"

Meanwhile, on March 20, Mute will release "The Abbatoir Blues Tour" CD/DVD, a four-disc set recorded at various shows, including London's Brixton Academy and Hammersmith Apollo.

Cave says he won't let up releasing as much music as possible, but he continues to struggle with an "industry geared around doing an album every three or so years. That way the marketing structure can work -- you can go do a lengthy tour and then disappear for a year while people forget about you. That's 13 songs every three years and for me, that's just not enough. One of the great things about Grinderman is that I've been able to dump out a whole lot more. I just want to leave this world with a massive catalog of songs."

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