Robin Thicke says he's "already got half of a brand new album ready to go." But the one he's got out now is too hot to stop. Both his sophomore album, "The Evolution of Robin Thicke," and its latest s

Robin Thicke says he's "already got half of a brand new album ready to go." But the one he's got out now is too hot to stop. Both his sophomore album, "The Evolution of Robin Thicke," and its latest single, "Lost Without U," have topped their respective R&B/Hip-Hop charts and are climbing the Billboard 200 and Hot 100, respectively.

For Thicke -- the son of actor Alan Thicke and actress/singer Gloria Loring -- it's "a little bit of redemption" after the commercial failure of his 2002 debut "Cherry Blue Skies" (re-released in 2003 as "Beautiful World").

So despite writing and producing songs for Usher, Christina Aguilera, Mya, Marc Anthony, Brandy and others, Thicke tells Billboard.com that he went through a period "wondering if people liked me, if I was cool enough, talented enough, sexy enough and what my problem was if I wasn't connecting with people. I had the whole Mariah Carey breakdown and everything. I was drinking brown liquor for breakfast. It was ... great."

"The Evolution..." took its own time getting started, too, coming out a year after its first single -- "Wanna Love U Girl" with Pharrell -- failed to drum up significant heat. But now that it's taking off, Thicke says he feels like he's "reborn, I'm having a comeback, but I was never there. I'm on my second album, but I still feel like a brand new artist. It's an overnight success, you know? It's like a comeback for somebody who just arrived."

He plans to stay here, too. Thicke and Interscope are currently considering the album's next single -- his preference is "Can U Believe" -- and he's looking towards a year full of touring. But, he says, that next album will never be too far from his mind.

"I've always had a studio in my house," says Thicke, who's married to actress Paula Patton. "Every day that I have off I go right to my home and my studio and I write songs for two or three days. I really don't want to be on the road so long that I can't go back and make great records. I want to have a balance between performing and being in the studio."