OK Go frontman Damian Kulash says he and his bandmates are "anxious to get back to writing and recording." Can you blame them?

OK Go frontman Damian Kulash says he and his bandmates are "anxious to get back to writing and recording." Can you blame them?

Thanks to a wildly successful viral video campaign that has kept the group's second album, "Oh No," alive since its 2005 release -- including a best short form video Grammy for the treadmill-choreographed "Here It Goes Again" clip -- Kulash and company have not had much time to work on new material.

"We've been writing on the road," he tells Billboard.com, "but we find that a lot of what we write on the road sounds like covers of ourselves, like us trying to do that thing that OK Go does as opposed to a more honest reflection of something within."

OK Go is presently opening for Snow Patrol and then will support the Fray from June 11 to July 1. After that, however, the band plans to take much of the summer off in order to write new material and then enter the studio in the fall -- most likely in Sweden with "Oh No" producer Tore Johansson.

"We're huge fans of his," Kulash says, "and knowing what his strengths and weaknesses are from ('Oh No'), we could really go leaps and bounds ahead with him. At the same time, there's a particular thing he's good at, and we want to make sure that's complementary to our next phase."

There will certainly be greater expectations for OK Go's next effort, but Kulash cautions that he's not taking for granted that the fans who jumped on board with the Internet-spread videos for "Here It Goes Again," "A Million Ways" and "Do What You Want" will still be with the group when it comes out.

"Any sort of success you have, I think, comes with a whole lot of people who jump on board temporarily and are gone the next day," Kulash says. "You just hope that some decent percentage of them stick around to see what you do next and are interested in the larger project and care about the same things you care about. "We've certainly raised the bar, but we also are not going to judge the things we make in the future by the same terms that we judge what's going on (now)."