Flyleaf Hoping New Songs Heal The Hurt

Getting to the truth not only as a songwriter but as a band is what vocalist/lyricist Lacey Mosley hopes to accomplish with Flyleaf's follow-up to its 2005 self-titled album.

Getting to the truth not only as a songwriter but as a band is what vocalist/lyricist Lacey Mosley hopes to accomplish with Flyleaf's follow-up to its 2005 self-titled album.

"There are things about the latest record that we did that are the most accurate reflection of who we are and then there are also things about the record that have nothing to do with who we are," Mosley tells Billboard.com. "It has to do with the fact that we have a lot of people who are paying for our record and we have to compromise. But the stages our (new) songs are at now are just completely ours and that's beautiful."

While Mosley cites "Sorrow" as a song that perfectly encapsulates the band's mindset on its Octone/J Records debut, it's the chopped-up "There for You" that exemplifies compromised creativity. However, Mosley says the concert stage is where the group's personal integrity is restored, with "There For You" being completely reworked. She chalks up the entire experience as playing the label game.

"Even back then when we were making the decisions, we were kind of talking and saying, 'OK, we can do it this way' and it was only later on (after we) listened to the songs that we were really upset and embarrassed," Mosley says. "Like, that's not really us. We're just going to play it the way we want to play it, and that's how our live shows have always been -- a little different from the record."

From a stylistic standpoint, Mosley isn't quite sure how to describe the seven new tracks currently in the mix, including "Have We Lost?" and "Again." The Texas quartet is now road-testing material on its latest headlining club tour, which runs through the end of April.

Mosley hopes to begin recording a new album later this summer for a possible late 2007 or early 2008 release. "Howard Benson, our producer, who is really great and a genius, told me something that changed my perspective," Mosley says. "He told me you can make a record that musicians will listen to and appreciate or you can make a record that the whole world will appreciate, and I understand that. We'd rather have more people listen to our music because I think the story behind the songs are important for the kids to hear for this generation, for different people that are hurting. I guess that's what music is for. And we all hurt sometimes. Everybody hurts."