Don't you love British people? The British Invasion of 1964 made me an Anglophile forever, but they continue to keep a smile on my face, seemingly oblivious to the imminent music business armageddon,

Don't you love British people? The British Invasion of 1964 made me an Anglophile forever, but they continue to keep a smile on my face, seemingly oblivious to the imminent music business armageddon, distracting us with their wit and wisdom. First up is Pete Townshend, one of my all-time favorite people in the world who while on classic rock WAXQ (Q104.3) New York said, "The Police 'classic rock'? I don't think so. This is just music. It's not classic anything." And then added he was looking forward to the band's reunion tour.

The assault on rock's most historic sites continues as London prepares to demolish the Clissold Arms Pub where the Kinks played their first show in 1963 and has served as their mini-museum ever since. "Why on earth can't they have their posh gastro grub and still keep a part of it for tourists, Kinks fans and the curious?" Kinks lead guitarist Dave Davies asked.

The Kaiser Chiefs have turned down an invitation to play the Diana: Princess of Wales Memorial Concert, saying it would be hypocritical to play it, and that anyone who does is doing it purely to sell records. "Elton John knew her, let him play it," they matter of factly said.

And finally, hard as it is to imagine, the executives at Disney are having some sort of problem with one of their actors snorting up his father's ashes mixed with cocaine. They seem to think Keith Richards' family values might adversely affect ticket sales for "Pirates of the Caribbean III." Silly boys, au contraire. It is because of Richards' pre-publicity favor that the film's opening will be the biggest in history. Relax, baby. Come to think of it, are we sure Andrew Loog Oldham wasn't behind this?

See you on the radio.