Juggling follow-ups for critically acclaimed bands doesn't seem to be a problem for Canadian indie rock artist Spencer Krug. First up is Sunset Rubdown's third release, "Random Spirit Lover," due Oct.

Juggling follow-ups for critically acclaimed bands doesn't seem to be a problem for Canadian indie rock artist Spencer Krug. First up is Sunset Rubdown's third release, "Random Spirit Lover," due Oct. 2 as the first in a new deal with Jagjaguwar.

"I would say that the structures of songs in Sunset Rubdown are getting quite elaborate, whereas before we might have curbed or restricted that impulse," Krug tells Billboard.com. "I think we consciously were trying to get a cleaner, more direct, to-the-point kind of sound, with every note having a specific purpose. No filler. But old habits die hard and I know that throughout the record there are moments of absolute clusterf*ck."

Of the recording process, Krug says that each song was recorded in the order that it appears on the album, as well as finished, before moving to the next. "Each song was treated as its own piece of art and worked on carefully, considerately, in attempt to let it reach it's full potential," Krug says. "Doing it one track at a time, in order, allowed us to watch the record unfold as we recorded it, and record each song in accordance with how it would compliment the one that came before it, and what was coming next."

"I liked working this way more than doing a pile of bed tracks, then going back and doing overdubs on everything, then going back again to do vocals all at one go," he adds. "I think that way of working treats the songs with less respect, as cheesy as that sounds, and can lead to flat albums, texturally, or some kind of aesthetic monotony."

Compared to his full-time work with Wolf Parade, Krug describes the Sunset Rubdown experience as "slower" and "purposefully thought out. Sunset Rubdown is more of an emotional exercise," he explains. "[It's] the band that I use to get sh*t off my chest, and more of a cerebral thing too, musically, where I allow myself to indulge in nerdy tendencies like long structures, and two or three part harmonies, guitar solos, etc."

Wolf Parade is in the midst of recording the follow-up to 2005's "Apologies to the Queen Mary," which debuted at No. 6 on Billboard's Heatseekers chart. Although no title or track listing is ready, Krug says that there is "an album's worth of songs."

"So far, I like it better than the last one. It feels more honest, more natural, less self-involved," Krug says. "We're realizing that what we do well together is play rock music. Catchy stuff. And so on this record we're letting that blossom instead of fighting it."

Krug also says that it's "more collaborative" than "Apologies," contains "less distorted synthesizers" and "a few moments you might think of Stevie Wonder."

Wolf Parade will kick off a month-long tour Aug. 11 in Kingston, Canada, while Sunset Rubdown is slated for an October outing, starting at Boston's Middle East Club on Oct. 7.

Questions? Comments? Let us know: @billboard

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