Bryan Adams is planning to release a new album this fall -- even though it doesn't have a title yet, or a label deal in the United States.

Bryan Adams is planning to release a new album this fall -- even though it doesn't have a title yet, or a label deal in the United States.

Nevertheless, Adams tells Billboard.com that he's been working on the 12-song set "for a couple of years, and it's coming out really well." Like his last studio outing, 2004's "Room Service," Adams has been recording his new songs in hotel rooms and other locales while he's on the road, a system that appeals to him most these days.

"I bring out an engineer, everything fits into a suitcase and we just record," says Adams, who's recorded tracks in Hungary, Denmark, Malta and other mostly European territories. "I have so much spare time during that day that it makes sense to utilize it to do something creative like that, as opposed to just sitting around the hotel and sightseeing or something."

Though he's waiting to release songs titles and other specifics about the album, Adams describes it as "quite a personal record" that was influenced by his travels. "It's inevitable that some of this is gonna wear off on you," he says. "You travel around and you think about the things you do when you're traveling (and) it's going to wear off on what you write about."

The Canadian native, who now lives in London, is signed to Universal in the U.K. He says his Vancouver-based manager Bruce Allen is negotiating with some U.S. labels, which Adams would prefer to releasing the album himself.

"I'm still interested in what a label can do, a network that's already set up," he explains. "All I'm really interested in is getting the music to the people. I don't even care about the money."

Adams will be bringing the music to the U.S. in early August and October, via a pair of short runs co-headlining with George Thorogood & the Destroyers. He first met Thorogood in the '80s at the Peabody Hotel in Memphis, joining a jam session at the bar that also included the Stax bass legend Donald "Duck" Dunn.

"It was a late-night drinking session, which I sort of stepped into," Adams recalls with a laugh. "We got up to jam and somebody said, 'Okay, 'Midnight Hour,' and Duck says, 'OK, we're doing it in the original key. Then George says, 'I don't care, I'm playing it in this key.' so they played the song in two different keys. And it worked!"