Less than a year after releasing its fourth studio effort, "In Our Bedroom After the War," Stars is already thinking ahead to its next album.

Less than a year after releasing its fourth studio effort, "In Our Bedroom After the War," Stars is already thinking ahead to its next album.

"We want to try to make a record that's a dance record, an electronic record, sort of more reminiscent of some older stuff that we did, and also try to make a record that is maybe even more acoustic than the ones we make," singer Torquil Campbell tells Billboard.com. "Just try to push those extremes."

He adds, "I think we feel really good about the band now because I think we've gotten into the period in our lives and our work together where we do know who we are. We've kind of transcended our influences in the sense of finding our own musical techniques and voices."

While Campbell says Stars will tour "In Our Bedroom After the War" throughout 2008, including a stateside jaunt that begins Wednesday (March 19) in Baltimore, the Canadian outfit plans to use the summer to write its next album due out in 2009, along with an EP that will hopefully be released later this year.

"We'd love to be able to put out some new material this year and keep the ideas going," Campbell says. "What we're hoping is that we can just stop playing in cycles and start playing more and making records when we have time, and keeping both things kind of constantly flowing."

The EP would include material that didn't make "In Our Bedroom After the War," as well as new tunes and possibly re-recordings of older Stars songs. In addition to a solo Campbell album, which has no timeframe for completion but remains in his thoughts, he's expecting a call from his friends in Broken Social Scene. Both Campbell and Stars band mate Amy Millan are part of the extensive Broken Social Scene family.

One thing Campbell isn't sure of is whether Stars will release new material in the same fashion it released "In Our Bedroom After the War," which was made available in a digital format months before the album received a proper street date.

"That was an interesting vibe," Campbell says. "I think it worked great in some ways and in other ways, I think we were slightly ahead of the industry on it. On the press side, it complicated things because people didn't know when to cover the record. But with an EP, that's a perfect form to use the Internet, something that's not your big push or big project for the year. I think with albums, you still have go down that road in using the mass media to get people's attention."