Fred and his readers discuss "American Idol," male duos and Frank Sinatra.

COOK THE RECORD BOOKS

Fred:

Now that "American Idol" has declared a winner, there's no reason to hide iTunes sales of "Idol" performances. So which tracks will be eligible for next week's Hot 100? The reason I'm asking is that as I write this, the top four tracks on both the American and Canadian versions of iTunes are all by David Cook - "The Time of My Life," "Dream Big," "I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For" and "The World I Know." If chart-eligible, and if those sales hold, Cook could nearly match the previously thought untouchable achievement of the Beatles when they held the top five tracks during the same week, on the chart dated April 4, 1964.

The five Beatles tracks were (from No. 1 to No. 5) "Can't Buy Me Love," "Twist and Shout," "She Loves You," "I Want to Hold Your Hand" and "Please Please Me." I know because I read about it in "The Billboard Book of Number One Hits." I recommend the book highly.

Patrick Kelly
Brampton, Ont., Canada


Dear Patrick,

As long as iTunes reports sales of specific tracks, they can appear on the Billboard charts, so it will be interesting to see where David Cook's songs show up on next week's Hot 100, and what kinds of records he sets, if any. Without significant airplay, the four songs you mention are unlikely to debut at the top of the charts, unless their sales numbers are so overwhelming that the amount of airplay won't matter.

David Archuleta also has a number of songs in the iTunes top 100 at the moment, so he could make his Hot 100 debut as well. Whatever happens, I'll report it in next week's Chart Beat.

Since you kindly referenced "The Billboard Book of Number One Hits," I can tell you that after the "Idol" finale on Wednesday night, I consoled Archuleta by letting him know he would very likely be appearing in the next editions of my books. In case Chart Beat readers haven't figured it out from my Q&A with David A., he's the seventh season finalist who is "obsessed" (his father's and mother's word, not mine) with my books. He discovered them years ago at a Borders bookstore, and a friend of his bought them for him.



TWO GUYS FROM CHARTSVILLE

Hi Fred,

I was having a chat with a friend about the most successful male duos on the Hot 100 in terms of No. 1 songs and top 10 hits. We came up with the following top five Is this an accurate reflection or have we missed some? We are certainly happy there are two Aussie acts on the list!

Daryl Hall and John Oates - six No. 1s, 15 top 10s
Simon and Garfunkel - three No. 1s, eight top 10s
Wham! - three No. 1s, seven top 10s
Air Supply - one No. 1, eight top 10s
Savage Garden- two No. 1s, four top 10s

Regards,

Robert Ghanem
Sydney, Australia


Dear Robert,

Without researching your question, I thought of one male duo missing from the list as soon as I read your e-mail. They had three No. 1 singles and 15 top 10 hits, which would put them in second place on your list. Their first names are Don and Phil and they are known as the Everly Brothers. I'd also have to give some consideration to a pair of brothers who weren't really brothers: the Righteous Brothers, with two No. 1s and six top 10 hits.


THE COMPLETE SINATRA

Hi Fred,

Love your insights and read Chart Beat and Chart Beat Chat every week without fail. What you said about Frank Sinatra is technically accurate, but why stop there? If we go back to all pop album charts in Billboard, Frank debuted on March 23, 1946, with the No. 1 album "The Voice of Frank Sinatra," giving him a career span of 62 years and two months. Neil Diamond would have been five years old at the time! If we add all the albums in between, he had a total of six No. 1s and nine second-spot chart hits. The achievement you mentioned is a great accomplishment but it is only part of the greatness that is Frank Sinatra.

Tim Meyers


Dear Tim,

I'm happy to give Frank Sinatra his due, so thanks for pointing out his earlier work. I was only speaking of his chart run on the tally we know today as The Billboard 200. Prior to the introduction of the weekly album chart on March 24, 1956, Billboard did publish album charts, but not on a weekly basis.

And I'm glad you enjoy Chart Beat and Chart Beat Chat - thanks for letting me know!

Questions? Comments? Let us know: @billboard

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