O.A.R. frontman Marc Roberge says that variety was the primary goal for his band's sixth studio album, "All Sides," which comes out July 15.

O.A.R. frontman Marc Roberge says that variety was the primary goal for his band's sixth studio album, "All Sides," which comes out July 15.

"The name 'All Sides' was thought of almost two years ago, when I started writing the demos, 'cause I didn't want to get caught up in the same musical style on every song," Roberge tells Billboard.com.

"The point of each demo was to go down a different path, all to the same end of something we could play live and be effective with and that our fans would dig."

Roberge wrote "30 or 40 songs that came from different places" for the album before taking it into the studio with producer Matt Wallace (Maroon5, the Replacements, Faith No More), who he says "has always been in the running for our records." Wallace also brought O.A.R. out to Los Angeles to record, the first time the quintet has worked on an album away from the East Coast.

"We wanted to get out of the sludge of winter," explains Roberge, who feels that working on the West Coast had a pronounced effect on "All Sides." "I think the L.A. weather had a huge part in this record. It kinda kept us vibrant and happy. It was sunny all the time. I just felt rejuvenated."

The group's working arrangement also played a part in things, says the frontman. "I'm not a late-night studio guy anymore," Roberge says with a laugh. "It used to be I'd go in at midnight, work all night and find when I got out of there I'd be so messed up and never get anything done. In L.A. we'd be [in the studio] around nine [A.M.] and finish by six or seven and go home. Every day we were working a long time, but always normal hours where I could go back at night and hang with my wife and be with my dogs and be normal."

With the album's first single, "Shattered," out, O.A.R. is already on the road -- where Roberge expects the group to stay well into 2009 with dates around the world, including Australia, New Zealand, Japan and, hopefully, Europe.

"I'm at a point in my life where I truly realize I'm lucky to do this for a living," Roberge says. "Every opportunity we get, we try to take full advantage of, because we've seen 'em come and go; we don't want to be one of those bands. We want to take advantage of being able to play and not disappear on people."

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