Olly Murs, Lindsay Lohan, Samantha Mumba, JC Chasez and Jennifer Love Hewitt
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"Now That's What I Call Music! 50" has just been released. Let's stroll through some of the underrated cuts from the hit series' lengthy back catalogue.

Since its debut in 1998, the "Now That's What I Call Music!" album series has dutifully gathered the biggest pop hits on the planet and presented those Top 40 smashes in regular, easy-to-digest compilations. Anyone who's anyone in contemporary pop music has appeared on a "Now!" album; your favorite pop song of the past 15 years is probably on one of them. And as the franchise has progressed, it has expanded in its numbered series to include country, rock, R&B and hip-hop hits, while also supporting all-Christmas entries, branching off into a country series, and releasing editions dedicated to the 80's, classic rock, love songs, Disney hits and faith-based music, among many others. Remarkably, all 49 of the numbered "Now" albums have reached the Top 10 of the Billboard 200 chart, and "Now! 50" has a great shot at continuing that streak.

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Not every song on a "Now!" album can be an all-time hit, of course; with up to 20 songs included on each album (typically released every four months), some of the "Now!" songs are long-forgotten hits, sometimes from artists that never became household names. Today, we salute the "Now!" songs that did not rule the charts but, at times, ruled our hearts -- songs by Sonique, Nick Lachey, Evan and Jaron, and of course, Lindsay Lohan included.

Listen to our playlist of 50 forgotten gems from the "Now!" franchise, and see which ones are a blast from your past (note: this list do not include any 'Now! Next' songs, a collection of tracks from rising artists that have appeared on the later editions of the franchise).

Harvey Danger, "Flagpole Sitta"
Found On: Now That's What I Call Music!
Released: October 1998

A snark-fueled anthem from a one-hit wonder, "Flagpole Sitta" went back-to-back with Fastball's "The Way" on the original "Now," presenting a solid run from the alt-rock days of yore.

Imajin, "Shorty (You Keep Playin' With My Mind)"
Found On: Now That's What I Call Music!
Released: October 1998

A few years before B2K cornered the R&B boy-band market, there was Imajin, the dubiously named quartet with a genuinely enjoyable single that features some emotional drawing-out of the phrase "player hatin'" in the second verse.

Blackstreet & Mya feat. Mase & Blinky Blink, "Take Me There"
Found On: Now That's What I Call Music! 2
Released: July 1999

That cutesy intro you're hearing? Yeah, that's the theme song to Nickelodeon's "Rugrats" -- this happy-go-lucky track was the first single to "The Rugrats Movie" soundtrack.

Baz Luhrmann, "Everybody's Free (To Wear Sunscreen)"
Found On: Now That's What I Call Music! 2
Released: July 1999

Between directing "Romeo + Juliet" and "Moulin Rouge!," Baz Luhrmann scored an out-of-nowhere hit with a spoken-word interpolation of 1997 Chicago Tribune column. The ultimate viral track, long before YouTube existed.

K-Ci & JoJo, "Tell Me It's Real"
Found On: Now That's What I Call Music! 3
Released: December 1999

Props to super-crooners K-Ci & JoJo for scoring two songs on the first three "Now!" albums: after the enduring smash "All My Life" ended up on the first compilation, the relatively forgotten "Tell Me It's Real" was nestled between a Backstreet Boys track and Fatboy Slim's "The Rockafeller Skank" on "Now! 3."

Chante Moore, "Chante's Got a Man"
Found On: Now That's What I Call Music! 3
Released: December 1999

A Top 10 hit that blends fragile vocals, sassy spoken-word interjections and third-person references, "Chante's Got a Man" is the biggest hit from an R&B artist that released a new album, "Moore is Moore," last July.

Oleander, "Why I'm Here"
Found On: Now That's What I Call Music! 3
Released: December 1999

Looking for a slightly poppier version of Nirvana's "Heart-Shaped Box"? Look no further than Oleander's heavy hit "Why I'm Here," which studied the post-grunge blueprint and perfected it before the turn of the century.

Sonique, "It Feels So Good"
Found On: Now That's What I Call Music! 4
Released: July 2000

British DJ Sonique briefly crossed over to U.S. pop audiences with "It Feels So Good," a shimmering dance single with a deeply underrated music video. It was all a dream! Or was it?

Hanson, "This Time Around"
Found On: Now That's What I Call Music! 4
Released: July 2000

The narrative goes something like this: after breaking big with 1997's mega-selling "Middle of Nowhere," Hanson couldn't stick the landing on the 2000 follow-up "This Time Around," and disappeared from the radio waves. But "This Time Around's" title track, buried at the end of "Now! 4," might secretly be Hanson's best-ever single. Gloriously schlocky pop-rock, and still undeniable 14 years later.

Nine Days, "Absolutely (Story of a Girl)"
Found On: Now That's What I Call Music! 5
Released: November 2000

Another Top 10 hit from a rock group that quickly disappeared from mainstream music, "Absolutely (Story of a Girl)" is fueled by scruffy charm -- who doesn't nod appreciatively along with the line, "And while she looks so sad in photographs/I absolutely love her… when she smiles"?

soulDecision, "Faded"
Found On: Now That's What I Call Music! 5
Released: November 2000

A boy band that existed at a time when there were simply too many boy bands, the incredible named soulDecision still has one pristine pop single under its Canadian belt -- although "Ooh It's Kinda Crazy" isn't half-bad, either.

Samantha Mumba, "Gotta Tell You"
Found On: Now That's What I Call Music! 6
Released: April 2001

What song was slotted at No. 2 on the "Now! 6" track list, between Britney Spears' "Stronger" and *NSYNC's "Bye Bye Bye"? That's right, Samantha Mumba's "Gotta Tell You" was a fast-burning hit for the Irish singer, who would eventually depart music to star in films like 2002's "The Time Machine" and 2005's "Boy Eats Girl."

Evan and Jaron, "From My Head to My Heart"
Found On: Now That's What I Call Music! 7
Released: July 2001

Unbelievably, identical twins Evan and Jaron Lowenstein have had two songs featured in the "Now!" series, first with their breakout hit "Crazy For This Girl" and then with the minor power-pop hit "From My Head To My Heart." Three years later, Evan and Jaron was no more, although Jaron would return years later to forge a country music career.

The Wiseguys feat. Greg Nice, "Start The Commotion"
Found On: Now That's What I Call Music! 8
Released: November 2001

Made famous through its use in a Mitsubishi TV ad, the Wiseguys' "Start The Commotion" was later featured in "Zoolander" and became an unexpected radio hit for the electronic duo.

JIVEjones, "Me Myself & I"
Found On: Now That's What I Call Music! 8
Released: November 2001

Miami producer-songwriter JIVEjones helmed hits like Mandy Moore's "Candy" before stepping out on his own with this intensely strange single, released (natch) on Jive Records. Following "Me Myself & I," Jones practically disappeared from pop, never releasing a proper album in the U.S..

Mr. Cheeks, "Lights, Camera, Action!"
Found On: Now That's What I Call Music! 9
Released: March 2002

Terrance Darren Kelly, better known as Mr. Cheeks, was the leader of the New York hip-hop group Lost Boyz before briefly finding solo success with the Top 20 hit "Lights, Camera, Action!" Fun fact: Gil Scott-Heron was Mr. Cheeks' uncle through marriage!

Baha Men, "Move It Like This"
Found On: Now That's What I Call Music! 10
Released: July 2002

Better known as the song that isn't "Who Let The Dogs Out," "Move It Like This" is a canine-free dance cut from the Baha Men that squeezed a few more drops of chart juice out of the soon-to-vanish collective.

Jennifer Love Hewitt, "BareNaked"
Found On: Now That's What I Call Music! 11
Released: November 2002

Jennifer Love Hewitt couldn't quite construct the pop career that she longed for following "Party of Five" and the "I Know What You Did Last Summer" films, but she'll always have "BareNaked," an earnest pop single produced by Meredith Brooks (!) and designed for coffee shops, on "Now! 11."

Dirty Vegas, "Days Go By"
Found On: Now That's What I Call Music! 11
Released: November 2002

A Grammy-winning dance cut from U.K. electronica vets Dirty Vegas, "Days Go By" follows the Wiseguys' "Start The Commotion" as a "Now!" inclusion boosted by its placement in a Mitsubishi TV ad.

Nivea feat. Brian & Brandon Casey of Jagged Edge, "Don't Mess with My Man"
Found On: Now That's What I Call Music! 12
Released: March 2003

"Here's a little advice for you/Find your own man!" Nivea concludes on her R&B single "Don't Mess With My Man," which scooped up two members of Jagged Edge to provide the song's male counterpart. Nivea had actually appeared in the "Now!" series five compilations earlier, as the featured artist on Mystikal's "Danger (Been So Long)."

JC Chasez, "Blowin' Me Up (With Her Love)"
Found On: Now That's What I Call Music! 12
Released: March 2003

We've already outlined the reasons why JC Chasez never became a huge solo star like his *NSYNC pal Justin Timberlake, but "Blowin' Me Up (With Her Love)," also featured on the "Drumline" soundtrack, still delivers as a flirtatious thumper.

Lisa Marie Presley, "Lights Out"
Found On: Now That's What I Call Music! 13
Released: July 2003

Elvis' only daughter finally released a debut album, "To Whom It May Concern," in 2003, and its snarling single wound up smack dab in the middle of "Now! 13." Presley eventually released two more full-lengths, including 2012's "Storm & Grace."

Murphy Lee feat. Jermaine Dupri, "Wat Da Hook Gon Be"
Found On: Now That's What I Call Music! 14
Released: November 2003

Following the multi-platinum success of Nelly, his fellow St. Lunatic Murphy Lee briefly enjoyed his own time in the spotlight with "Wat Da Hook Gon Be," off his under-appreciated 2003 debut "Murphy's Law." Another St. Louis native, Chingy, appeared one track earlier on "Now! 14," with "Right Thurr."

Eamon, "F--- It (I Don't Want You Back)"
Found On: Now That's What I Call Music! 15
Released: March 2004

Easily one of the strangest songs to ever appear on a "Now!" compilation, Eamon's explicit-laden kiss-off is at once terrifying and touching, and answers the question, "What would an R&B Eminem song sound like?"

Nina Sky feat. Jabba, "Move Ya Body"
Found On: Now That's What I Call Music! 16
Released: July 2004

Still a dancehall staple, "Move Ya Body" represents the legacy of identical twin duo Nicole and Natalie Albino, who have worked with Bruno Mars and Major Lazer over the past few years but have yet to duplicate the immediacy of this single.

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