The 10 Best Charting Movie Soundtracks Ever: 'Saturday Night Fever,' 'Purple Rain' and More
RSO, Arista, Warner Bros., Walt Disney

This Friday (May 10) will mark the release of the Baz Luhrmann-directed incarnation of book-based classic “The Great Gatsby.” Ahead of its theatrical debut, today (May 7) the effort’s soundtrack, “Music From Baz Luhrmann's Film: The Great Gatsby,” hits stores. Acclaimed rapper Jay-Z functions as executive music producer of the set, gathering up artists like Fergie, Emeli Sande and Lana Del Rey for both covers and original cuts.

How Great Will the "Gatsby" Soundtrack Be?

Putting so much money into an album of its kind is risky. But it could make a big splash on the Billboard 200 next week, which got us thinking: It’s been a while since a soundtrack has hit the charts hard and had staying power. Below, take a look at the soundtracks that spent the most weeks at No. 1 on the Billboard 200.

"West Side Story"
1962
Weeks at No. 1: 54

Remember when Adele's "21" spent a staggering 24 weeks at No. 1 to become one of the best-selling albums of all time? That run didn't even equal half of what the "West Side Story" soundtrack was able to accomplish upon its release in 1962. With timeless stage compositions like "I Feel Pretty," "Maria" and "Jet Song," the Bernstein-Sondheim collaboration spent a mind-boggling 54 weeks in the top spot of the Billboard 200 chart -- still a record today, and one that is likely to stand in place for years.

"South Pacific"
1958
Weeks at No. 1: 31

The 1958 album was based on the acclaimed World War II musical by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II and is highlighted by the sullen, yet joyous “There is Nothing Like a Dame," where the guys both celebrate and miss the women they’ve left for battle.  

"Saturday Night Fever"
1978
Weeks at No. 1: 24

Though they weren’t the only act featured on the album, which supported the John Travolta-starring disco-era movie, the Bee Gees are undoubtedly the stars of the set. “How Deep is Your Love,” “Night Fever” and, of course, “Stayin’ Alive” made this effort a classic.

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