Selena Hologram Is Coming, Quintanilla Family Confirms

AP Photo/Houston Chronicle, John Everett
Selena performs at the Astrodome during the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo on Feb. 26, 1995.

Selena Quintanilla, the late queen of Tejano music, is getting her own hologram, per an announcement that was made on her official Facebook page. Billboard reached out to the late singer's sister, Suzette, who confirmed the news

Named "Selena The One," it is being referred to as a “walking, talking, singing, and dancing, digital embodiment” of the Mexican American icon.

According to the statement, this hologram of sorts “will release new songs and videos, will collaborate with current hit artists, and aims to go on tour in 2018.”

Exclusive: Selena's Sister Says Hologram is 'Not About Replacing Selena'

The company behind the project is Nevada-based Acrovirt LLC, an independent tech company in the business of "developing and commercializing the Digitized Human Essence with unparalleled interactivity."

According to Acrovirt LLC co-CEO Terry Kennedy (via his LinkedIn page), "Acrovirt has entered into research and development partnerships with the best neuroscience universities, to leverage Acrovirt's technologies that impose an individuals’ biological information into a digital environment. Using detailed individual personalized functions spanning the mind, brain and body, the individual’s Digitized Human Essence will autonomously learn and react on behalf of its human counterpart’s. The Digital Human Essence's will have the abilities to interact in various online forms in entertainment, sports, shopping, education and file sharing opportunities."

The site SelenaTheOne.com states that an IndieGoGo campaign aims to raise 500,000 in support of its creation. The project has already secured a media partnership from the San Diego Latino Film Festival.

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In 2014, Selena's father Abraham told the Associated Press that the creation of a hologram modeled after his daughter was more complicated than anticipated, citing costs and technical limitations. "The prices are ridiculous and it requires the transportation of tons of equipment," he told AP after meeting with San Diego-based AV Concepts, which was involved in the projection of the Tupac hologram at Coachella in 2012. 

Selena's brother A.B. told AP that after their meeting with AV Concepts in 2013, "we all decided that it wasn't enough for the fans...she looked like a ghost. The image was not well defined."

Read our exclusive interview with Suzette Quintanilla offering details about the hologram here